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Full text of "Mary Washington College Bulletin, Student Handbook, July, 1979"



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EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS 

Fire 432 

Illness or Injury (Infirmary) 206 

Police 234 

DIRECTORY OF GENERAL OFFICES AND SERVICES 

Academic Advising 294, 295 

Alumni (Fairfax) 248 

Bookstore 316,317 

Career Placement Services 226 

College Police 234 

College Shop 326 

Comptroller 231 

Counseling Center 314,361 

Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid 281 

Dean of Students 241,242 

Dean of the College 251,252 

Dining Hall 276 

Farmers & Merchants Branch Bank (Lee Hall) 529 

Infirmary 206 

Klein Theater (Backstage) 330 

Klein Theater (Box Office) 375 

Library 

Acquisitions 267 

Archives 286 

Circulation 264 

Librarian 266 

Periodicals 265 

Mail Room 321 

President 221 

Reprographic Services 307 

Student Activities 273, 274 

Student Employment 281 

Student Records 291 

Switchboard (Telephone Information) 461 

DIRECTORY OF MAJOR STUDENT OFFICERS 

Student Association President 550 

Student Association Vice President 559 

Student Association Judicial Chairman 558 

Honor Council President 557 

Class Council President 219 



STUDENT HANDBOOK 
1979-80 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

OF 

MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 



Mary Washington College Bulletin, Student Handbook Issue, 
USPS 072-680, Volume 1 0, Number 2, July, 1 979. Published 
quarterly by Mary Washington College, Fredericksburg, Virginia 
22401. Second Class Postage Paid at the Post Office, 
Fredericksburg, Virginia, 22401 . 



This Handbook has been prepared so that Mary Washington 
College students may have a better understanding of their insitu- 
tion, its rules and regulations. This handbook is not an all- 
inclusive listing of College policies and regulations. For more 
comprehensive information students should consult the College 
Catalog and the appropriate College official or office. 



AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

Mary Washington College is committed to the concept that all 
people shall have an opportunity to develop and work to the 
limits of their abilities. The College does not discriminate on the 
bases of race, color, religion, physical disability, national origin, 
political affiliation, marital status, sex (except in housing) or age 
in admitting and housing students or in employing and pro- 
moting faculty and staff members. It is expected that each stu- 
dent who enrolls at Mary Washington College will uphold these 
ideals of equality. Questions in these matters should be directed 
to Dr. A. R. Merchent, Vice President and AAEEO Officer, Room 
213, George Washington Hall or made in writing to Box 3575 
College Station, Fredericksburg, Virginia, 22401 , or telephoned 
to (703) 373-7250 Extension 214. 



STATEMENT OF RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

OF 
MEMBERS OF THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY 



Members of the College community have responsibilities in- 
cumbent upon all citizens, as well as the responsibilities of their 
particular roles within the acdemic community. 

All members share the obligation to respect the right of 
freedom of inquiry, of religion, of speech, of press, of peaceful 
assemblage or association and of petition to the institution for a 
redress of grievances. 

The rights of members of the College community shall not be 
denied or abridged on account of race, creed, national origin, 
marital status or sex. 

The members of the College community have the right to be 
secure in their persons, residences, offices, papers and effects, 
against unreasonable searches and seizures. 

All members of the College community have the right to due 
process in matters concerning discipline or their status as 
members of the College community. 

All members of the College community have other respon- 
sibilities and rights incident to the educational process and to the 
requirements of the search for truth and its free presentation. 

The enumeration of the rights and responsibilities outlined in 
this statement shall not be construed to deny or disparage others 
retained by the members of the College community. 

The term "member of the College community" embraces the 
College as an institution, the faculty as a body and all members 
of the administration, faculty, staff and student body in their of- 
ficial and individual capacities. 



ALMA MATER 



All hail, dear Alma Mater 
We sing our praise to you, 
High on Marye 's Hilltop 
You stand forever true; 
Born in truth and honor 
You ever more shall be, 
The model of our future years 
And all eternity. 

Whene'er we have to leave you 
We never will forget, 
The lessons you have taught us, 
And all the friends we've met; 
And we your sons and daughters 
Will hold your name on high, 
So here's to Mary Washington; 
Our love will never die. 

Irene Taylor '47 
Jean Crotty '47 






1979-1980 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 



August 

1 5 Wednesday 



25 Saturday 



Last day to pay fees without $25 penal- 
ty 
22 Wednesday Student Leadership Conference begins. 

Residence Halls open at 1 p.m. 
Residence Halls open at 9 a.m. for new 
students who have not participated in a 
summer pre-college orientation pro- 
gram. Orientation program begins at 1 
p.m. 

Residence Halls open 9 a.m. for new 
students who have participated in a 
summer orientation program. Student 
Association Orientation for all new 
students begins at 1 p.m. 
Residence Halls open at 9 a.m. for re- 
turning students. Late registration takes 
place. 
Classes begin 



26 Sunday 



27 Monday 



28 Tuesday 

September 

4 Tuesday 
1 1 Tuesday 

21-22 Friday- 
Saturday 

25 Tuesday 

26 Wednesday 

October 

5 Friday 

9 Tuesday 

10 Wednesday 

22 Monday 

29 Monday 



Last day to add courses 

Last day to withdraw with a refund of 

80% of semester charges 

Last day to change to pass / fail 

Family Weekend 

Last day to drop courses without perma- 
nent record showing W / P or W / F 
Career Day 

Mid-semester vacation begins at 5 p.m. 
Residence Halls close at 7 p.m. 
Residence Halls open at 1 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Mid-semester grades due 
Last day to withdraw with a refund of 
50% of semester charges 
Registration for second semester 
begins. Registration continues through 
November 1 6 



November 

1 5 Thursday Last day to drop courses without an 

automatic F 
1 6 Friday Second semester registration ends 

21 Wednesday Thanksgiving Holiday begins at 12:05 

p.m. Residence Halls close at 2 p.m. 

25 Sunday Residence Halls open at 1 p.m. 

26 Monday Classes resume at 8 a.m. 



December 
6 
7-8 

10-15 



15 
19 



Thursday 
Friday- 
Saturday 
Monday- 
Saturday 
Saturday 



Last day of classes 
Reading Days 

Examinations 

Residence Halls close at 7 p.m. 



Wednesday Grades due in Office of Student Records 



SECOND SEMESTER 



January 
3 


Thursday 


13 


Sunday 


14 
21 
28 


Monday 
Monday 
Monday 


February 

11 


Monday 


29 


Friday 


March 
9 
10 


Sunday 
Monday 



31 Monday 



April 



3 Thursday 



Last day to pay fees without a $25 
penalty 

Residence Halls open at 9 a.m. New stu- 
dent advising and registration 2-5 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to add courses 
Last day to withdraw with a refund of 
80% of semester charges 

Last day to drop courses without perma- 
nent record showing W / P or W / F. 
Spring vacation begins at 5 p.m. 
Residence Halls close at 7 p.m. 
Mid-semester grades due 

Residence Halls open at 1 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to withdraw with a refund of 
50% of semester charges 
Registration for Fall Semester. 
Registration continues through April 1 8 

Last day to drop courses without an 
automatic F. 



18 


Friday 


Registration for fall semester ends 


24 


Thursday 


Last day of classes 


25-26 


Friday- 
Saturday 


Reading Days 


28-30 


Monday- 
Wednesday 


Examinations 


May 






1-3 


Thursday- 
Saturday - 


Examinations continue 


3 


Saturday 


Residence Halls close at 9 p.m. for 
students who are not candidates for 
Graduation 


6 


Tuesday 


Senior grades due by noon 


8 


Thursday 


All grades due by 4 p.m. 


10 


Saturday 


Graduation. Residence Halls close at 1 1 
p.m. 



THE HONOR COUNCIL 



Dear Fellow Student, 

Can you imagine what our campus would be like without the 
honor system? If you can't then just visit a school where an 
honor system doesn't exist. You will find a heavy cloud of anxie- 
ty and distrust pervading its students, manifesting itself in the 
proctoring of tests, the close guarding of books from theft and a 
general tension in both the dorms and the academic buildings. 
Compare this with the trust, the freedom and the responsibility 
that the honor system here at Mary Washington gives to all of 
us, every day. 

The honor system if our tool: we can make it work or we can 
ignore it until it is inevitably taken away from us. Because it gives 
to us, we must give to the honor system our attention, and help 
those who abuse the system to understand it. For the honor 
system is a learning process: those who know and feel the 
system must help and teach those who are new to it; thus, we 
can eliminate fear and abuse of the system. 

Let's meet the challenge to make a student run system work. 
It will be difficult unless we all work together. This is perhaps 
your last chance to really make a difference and make an actual 
system work in today's world. It is time for all of us to give to the 
honor system — we can't afford to lose it. 

Good luck in the coming year. 

Sincerely, 





Lisa Nichols 

President, The Honor Council 

1979-80 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



Dear Fellow Students, 

My purpose in writing this letter is not to bore you with a lot of 
facts on what the Student Association is and does, nor with your 
responsibilities as a member of the College community. There 
are, however, a few things which must be pointed out for those 
who are new here and for those of you who have never felt the 
urge or desire to become involved on campus. 

As members of the Mary Washington College community, we 
are all placed in a very special situation. We are a small liberal 
arts college, and each of us comes here to further our educations 
and better prepare ourselves for our futures. Our academics are 
a primary concern, but so, too, are our non-academic activities. 
Books cannot teach us all we will need once we leave this 
specialized society; we must learn also from our social interac- 
tions. 

At Mary Washington, this learning to get along with others 
tends to be made easier by the more personal one-to-one rela- 
tionships which a small school provides. This same small size, 
however, also requires a larger percentage of the student body 
to become involved in student activities and groups, if these 
groups are to be successful and meaningful. Through involve- 
ment in these groups we can all benefit by gaining increased 
knowledge and increased enjoyment during our academic 
career. 

Only through your involvement and voicing your opinions can 
your problems and complaints be dealt with, so don't be afraid to 
speak out, but do so through the SA where your views can be 
heard and acted upon. 

Sincerely 



Steven P. Schlimgen c 
President, Student Association 
1979-80 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



College Organization 11 

Duties, functions and 
locations of Administrative 
Offices 



College Services 17 

Academic, social, health, 
recreational and mainten- 
ance service information 



College Regulations 26 

Administrative, disciplinary, 
housing, safety and codes of 
conduct 



Student Rules 56 

Disciplinary, conduct, 
housing, safety and 
student codes 



Student Affairs 71 

The Student Association 

Class Council 

Student membership on faculty committees 

Honor Council 



Clubs, Organizations, and Student Offices 116 

Description of clubs and organizations 
Listing of student officers 



Index 135 










Dear Students: 

Mary Washington College is an outstanding undergraduate in- 
stitution offering a broad scope of educational, cultural, social 
and service opportunities. It is my hope that each of you will 
seek to benefit in full from the many programs and resources of 
the College. 

The Board of Visitors, Administration and Faculty of the Col- 
lege are proud of the Honor System under which the students of 
Mary Washington have chosen to live. The Honor Code and 
Honor System have their full support. 

Similarly, the Student Association is an effective organization 
through which the student body may assume considerable 
authority for self-government and share with the Faculty and 
Administration responsibility for promoting the objectives of 
Mary Washington. I urge each of you to be active participants in 
your Student Association. 

All members of the College community (students, faculty, ad- 
ministrative and service personnel) are expected to uphold stan- 
dards which reflect credit to themselves and the institution. Col- 
lege rules and regulations are kept to the minimum necessary to 
insure a campus environment which is safe, comfortable and 
supportive of the objectives of the College. 

This Student Handbook, as well as other publications, 
presents the policies and regulations of Mary Washington Col- 
lege applicable to students and other members of the College 
community. These policies, rules, and regulations are to be com- 
plied with by all members of the College Community. 

I welcome the opportunity to be of every possible service to 
each of you. My best wishes for a successful 1 979-80 year at 
Mary Washington. 

Sincerely, 




Prince B. Woodard 
President of the College 



College 
Organization 




Chapter 9.2, Section 23-91.34 through 91.44, Code of 
Virginia established Mary Washington College as an indepen- 
dent institution with a 1 2-member Board of Visitors to serve as 
the governing and policy making body for the institution. 

The section which follows provides a summary description of 
major administrative positions and the duties and respon- 
sibilities of these offices. 

PRESIDENT 

Prince B. Woodard 

Room 103, George Washington Hall 

The President is the chief executive, administrative and 
academic officer of Mary Washington College. Appointed by 
and responsible to the Board of Visitors of the College, the Presi- 
dent administers the policies of the Board and recommends to it 
policies and programs which will promote the interests of the 
College. The President is charged to exercise such general 
authority and control over the assets, affairs and programs of 
the College as shall be needed for its proper operation in confor- 
mity with the programs and policies determined by the Board. In 
addition, the President is responsible for the regulation of the 
various aspects of student life at the College, including student 
discipline. 

The administrative officials, faculty and Student Association 
officers are responsible to and recommend policy changes to the 
President. Although the President is responsible to the Board of 
Visitors for the over-all administration of the College, he has 
delegated to other administrative officers authority to supervise 
and administer various functions and operations of the College. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATION AND PLANNING 

William M. Anderson, Jr. 

Room 1 9, George Washington Hall 



/ 2/ College Organization 



The Vice President for Administration and Planning directs the 
management and planning activities of the College, coordinates 
institutional studies and directs special projects as assigned by 
the President. Responsibility for College reports to State and 
Federal agencies, the information systems of the institution and 
the non-instructional computer operation are assigned to this 
Vice President. Supervision of the Office of Student Records is 
also a major function of this administrator. 

Director of Institutional Research 

Dale A. Brown 

Room 1 9, George Washington Hall 

The Director of Institutional Research is responsible to the 
Vice President for Administration and Planning. He conducts 
studies designed to promote the efficient operation and ad- 
ministration of the College. He directs the operation of the Col- 
lege Administrative Computer Center and supervises the ad- 
ministrative software development activities of the Center. 

VICE PRESIDENT, DIRECTOR OF SUMMER PROGRAMS, CON- 
TINUING EDUCATION, BLS PROGRAM, AND AAEEO OFFICER 

A. Ray Merchent 

Room 213, George Washington Hall 

The Vice President is responsible for promoting, coordinating, 
and supervising three important elements of the academic pro- 
gram of the College: the summer program, continuing education 
and the BLS program. In this capacity, he functions as an adjunct 
administrator of the Office of the Dean of the College to insure 
articulation with the total academic offering of the College. A 
major function of the Vice President is to serve as the College Af- 
firmative Action / Equal Employment Opportunity Officer. This 
administrator also supervises a variety of support services of the 
College including the College Police, Communications and the 
College Office of Personnel. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

Mary Ann T. Burns 

Room 203, George Washington Hall 

The Dean of the College administers the academic program of 
the College and is concerned primarily with academic policies 
and procedures. This includes responsibility for academic pro- 
gram review and development, faculty recruitment, faculty per- 
formance evaluation, the instructional budget, academic re- 
quirements, academic awards and honors and academic proba- 



College Organization/ 1 3 



tions and suspensions. 

Two assistant deans are responsible to the Dean of the Col- 
lege for specific elements of the College program as follows: 

Assistant Dean for Advising 

Cornelia D. Oliver 

Room 209, George Washington Hall 

The Assistant Dean for Advising is responsible for the overall 
supervision and coordination of the academic advising program. 
Students seeking advice on the selection, addition or dropping 
of courses should consult the Assistant Dean for Advising. 

Assistant Dean for Career Services 

Ronald B. Head 

Room 203, George Washington Hall 

The Assistant Dean for Career Services is responsible for the 
overall career services program of the College including the ad- 
ministration of the Academic Internship Program of the College, 
the supervision of the Career Placement Services and the promo- 
tion and coordination of career study and advising activities of 
the various academic departments. 

COMPTROLLER 

Edward V. Allison, Jr. 

Room 109, George Washington Hall 

The Comptroller is the chief fiscal officer of the College. 
Specific duties and responsibilities include the preparation of an- 
nual and biennial budgets, maintenance of all fiscal records of 
the College, purchasing and disbursing, payroll and student ac- 
tivity accounts. In additions, the Comptroller is responsible for 
the physical plant, auxiliary enterprises and audio visual opera- 
tions of the College. 



DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID 

H. Conrad Warlick 

Room 303, George Washington Hall 

The Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid is responsible for all 
matters pertaining to admission of students. This officer super- 
vises the student financial aid program of the College, including 
scholarships, loans and part-time employment for students. 
Also, the Regional Scholarship Program is under the administra- 
tion of the Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid. 



1 4/College Organization 



Assistant Deans of Admissions and Financial Aid 
G. Forrest Dickinson, Jr. 
Room 307, George Washington Hall 
Stephen A. Jones 
Room 302, George Washington Hall 

Sallie F. Washington 

Room 301 , George Washington Hall 

Martin A. Wilder, Jr. 

Room 31 2-A, George Washington Hall 

The Assistant Deans are responsible for a broad range of stu- 
dent recruitment and admission activities, including on-campus 
interviews, visitation to secondary schools, participation in col- 
lege fairs, college night programs, working with alumni chapters 
and committees and providing prospective students with infor- 
mation and materials about the College. 

One Assistant Dean, Mr. G. Forrest Dickinson, Jr., directs the 
financial aid program of the College, including student loans, 
grants, scholarships, and student-work programs. 

DEAN OF STUDENTS 

Suzanne E. Gordon 

Room 308, George Washington Hall 

The Dean of Students is responsible for the campus life ac- 
tivities of students including student housing procedures. This 
involves such functions as student room assignments, selection 
of Residential Directors, supervision of residential life and liaison 
with officers of the Student Association and supervision of the 
College Infirmary. 

The Dean is responsible for developing, coordinating and im- 
plementing College-sponsored activities on and off campus, in- 
cluding the assignment of space and supportive services for stu- 
dent meetings and parties. 

Assistant Dean of Students 

Nona B. Wegner 

Room 204, Ann Carter Lee Hall 

The Assistant Dean of Students provides leadership and 
assistance to student organizations and establishes procedures 
for implementing a comprehensive activity program. Operating 
under the supervision of the Assistant Dean is the Office of Stu- 
dent Activities located in Ann Carter Lee Hall. This office main- 
tains a College calendar which clears all final scheduling of on- 
campus events and issues tickets for the concert series and 
other similar events. 



College Organization/ 1 5 



Assistant Dean of Students 

George W. Edwards 

Room 31 2B, George Washington Hall 

The Assistant Dean of Students supervises and directs the 
student housing operation including training programs for per- 
sonnel with assigned responsibilities in the residence halls and 
working with the Student Association in promoting a safe and 
pleasant residential environment for students. The Assistant 
Dean performs a variety of duties as defined by the Dean of 
Students. 

LIBRARIAN 

Ruby Y. Weinbrecht 

E. Lee Trinkle Library 

The Librarian is responsible for administering and managing all 
aspects of the library operation. This includes the responsibility 
for obtaining, preserving and making accessible to the College 
community all library resources needed for study and research. 
Library financial planning, budget formulation and control and 
the recruitment, supervision and development of the profes- 
sional and classified library staff are also important major func- 
tions of this position. Close cooperation is maintained by the 
librarian with the other major administrators of the College, 
department chairmen and faculty to assure that the library pro- 
vides adequate support for the academic program of the Col- 
lege. 

DIRECTOR OF THE COUNSELING CENTER 

Mary A. K. Kelly 

Third Floor, Hugh Mercer Hall 

The Director of the Counseling Center is responsible for pro- 
viding individual professional counseling, testing, guidance and 
psychological services to students who seek assistance or who 
are referred to the center. 

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT 

George E. Ball 

Room 1 3, George Washington Hall 

The Director of Development is responsible for the formula- 
tion, promotion and implementation of a comprehensive college 
development program. Long range planning of resource poten- 
tial for the College, including corporate and foundation support, 
deferred giving, estate planning and annual fund giving is an 
essential responsibility of this position. 



1 6 /College Organization 



DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SERVICES 

Linda N. Evans 

Room 1 3, George Washington Hall 

The Director of Information Services is responsible for the 
preparation and printing of major publications, the weekly 
Bulletin and selected audio / visual presentations about the Col- 
lege. News releases describing student and College activities are 
prepared in this office for local, state and national distribution by 
means of radio, television and newspapers. 

The Director of Information Services also supervises the Col- 
lege Mail Room and the Office of Reprographic Services. 



COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 

lima Overman, M.D. 

Hugh Mercer Infirmary 

The College physician supervises the infirmary services and 
staff and attends to the health and medical needs of residential 
students. She works closely with the Dean of Students, the 
Assistant Dean for Student Advising and the Director of the 
Counseling Center. 

RESIDENCE HALL DIRECTORS AND ADMINISTRATIVE AIDES 

Residence Hall Directors and Administrative Aides are respon- 
sible to the Dean of Students for the administration of the 
residential halls of the College. In freshman halls, the Residence 
Director is assisted by a staff of Residential Assistants. 



College 
Services 



ACADEMIC ADVISING 

The Advising Office provides counseling on academic matters 
for freshmen and sophomores. The Assistant Dean, the Advis- 
ing Counselor, and Adademic Advisers from the Faculty staff 
the office, consulting with students on programs, career 
possibilities and related academic matters. Selected Peer Ad- 
visers assist the advising staff. A student may at any time af- 
filiate with a department and be assigned a pro tem departmental 
adviser who will informally counsel on departmental and career 
aspects of course selection. After three semesters of course 
work (43 semester hours or more) a student must declare a ma- 
jor, and be assigned a faculty adviser in his or her major depart- 
ment. 

BANKING 

A branch of the Farmers and Merchants Bank offering full 
banking services is located in Ann Carter Lee Hall, and students 
may maintain accounts here. Students are cautioned not to keep 
large sums of cash in their rooms. 

BICYCLES 

A student may bring a bicycle to the College but must adhere 
to the rules governing bicycles as listed under Regulations. Park- 
ing racks are provided at each Residence Hall and some class- 
room buildings. There is very limited space available for storage 
of bicycles during the summer months. 

BOOKSTORE 

The College Bookstore sells textbooks used in the academic 
program. It also carries related instructional supplies, a few per- 
sonal items, greeting cards, film, jewelry, etc. A large depart- 
ment is devoted to "trade" books— both hard and paper- 
backed—made up of current novels, classics and recommended 
outside reading. 




/ 8/College Services 



BUILDING HOURS 

Generally speaking, when offices close and services cease, 
the buildings are locked. Exceptions are announced in advance 
when special functions are scheduled. 

Academic Buildings 

When the College is in session, academic buildings are open 
from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. On Satur- 
day, buildings are open only for scheduled classes and by special 
arrangements for that day. No academic buildings are open 
regularly on Sunday. A building directory in the main hall of the 
first floor of each building lists the specific hours when the 
special-purpose classrooms, laboratories or studies are open for 
use by students. A late closing hour begins five days before the 
start of examinations and ends on the fifth night of examina- 
tions. 

Ann Carter Lee Hall 

Although certain services have specified hours, the student 
activities building is open generally from 7:30 a.m. to 1 1 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, and from 1 2 noon to 1 1 p.m., Satur- 
days. 

Bank 

Monday-Friday . .9 a.m. -2 p.m. 

Friday 4 p.m. -7 p.m. 

Bookstore 

Monday-Friday 8 a.m. -5 p.m. 



Career Placement Services (Located on the third floor) 
Monday-Friday 8 a.m. -5 p.m. 

College Shop (Located on the main floor, the "C" Shop con- 
sists of a pub and a short order grill and is open to all mem- 
bers of the College community and their guests.) 

Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-1 1 p.m. 

Saturday 12 noon-1 1 p.m. 

Sunday 5p.m. -10p.m. 

Day Students Lounge (For exclusive use by nondormitory 
students as a study lounge; not open to dates.) 

Monday-Friday 7 a.m.-1 1 p.m. 

Saturday 12 noon-1 1 p.m. 

Sunday closed 



College Services/ 19 



Lounge A (Located on the main floor. Open to all students 
and their guests during designated hours.) 

Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m.-1 Op.m. 

Saturday by appointment 

through the Office 
of Student Activities 

Lounge B (Located on the same floor as the Bookstore.) 

Monday-Friday 7:30a.m.-10p.m. 

Saturday By appointment through the 

Office of Student Activities 

Office of Student Activities (Located on the same floor as 
the College Shop.) 

Monday-Friday 8 a.m. -5 p.m. 

Evenings As needed 

Weekends As needed 

Reserve Parlor (Located on the main floor) 
Available by advance registration through the Office of the 
President for hosting distinguished visitors to the campus. 
Groups of no more than 30 persons may be accommodated. 

Study Area A study area will be available in ACL for Mary 
Washington College students only. The specific location 
and hours will be announced in the College Bulletin. 

George Washington Hall 

All administrative offices and the campus mail service are 
open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Goolrick Hall 

The recreational facilities of Goolrick Hall are available when 
not in scheduled use, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., weekends. 

E. Lee Trinkle Library 

Monday-Thursday 8a.m.-1 1 p.m. 

Friday 8 a.m. -9 p.m. 

Saturday 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 

Sunday 1 p.m.-1 1 p.m. 

CAREER PLACEMENT SERVICES 

(located in Room 301 , Ann Carter Lee Hall) 
The Office of Career Placement Services assists prospective 



20/ 'College Services 



seniors and alumni in obtaining career employment. To this end, 
a library is maintained which contains current employment 
materials from a variety of sources. The office sponsors Career 
Days, Career Seminars, Business and Industry Visitations and 
information about graduate schools and fellowships. 

On-campus job interviews are arranged with numerous 
representatives in business, industry, government and educa- 
tion. Information about summer employment opportunities is 
available. 

COLLEGE BULLETIN 

The "College Bulletin" is published weekly during the fall and 
spring semesters and the summer sessions. It contains a calen- 
dar of events for the week following its publication and lists an- 
nouncements of concern to students, faculty and employees of 
the College. Announcements and activities of recognized stu- 
dent organizations will be included, but it is the responsibility of 
the organization to submit the information to the Office of Infor- 
mation Services by 5 p.m. on Monday for publication in the 
following Friday's "Bulletin." 

The "Bulletin" is distributed to boxes located in a prominent 
place in each academic building. It is also distributed in each dor- 
mitory by the head desk aide. Students are responsible for 
receiving and reading the "Bulletin" to be informed of official an- 
nouncements, important information and events on the campus. 

COLLEGE POLICE 

The primary function of the Office of College Police is to pro- 
tect students and College facilities and in general to aid in pro- 
moting safety and order on campus. The officers comprising the 
force have powers of arrest both on and off the campus for any 
violation of the Code of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Of- 
fice is located in Room 1 04B, Ann Carter Lee Hall and has per- 
sonnel on duty 24 hours daily while the College is in session. The 
Office can be contacted by telephone on Extension 234. 

COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE - COUNSELING CENTER 

The College seeks to provide adequate guidance and counsel- 
ing without removing from the student the responsibility for 
making personal decisions. 

For students with special problems the Counseling Center 
located on the third floor of Mercer Hall, offers psychological 
services on a full-time basis. Testing is available for the assess- 
ment of aptitude, interest and personality patterns as they relate 



College Services/2 1 



to academic and career-oriented expectations and plans. The 
Counseling Center also receives students (for the most part self- 
referred) who have problems in personal, emotional and social 
adjustment. The services of the Counseling Center are provided 
with complete assurance of confidentiality and on a non-fee 
basis to students seeking a Mary Washington College degree. 

EMPLOYMENT AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

The College offers many opportunities for part-time employ- 
ment. Most positions, which include those in the Library, 
residence hall, dining hall and faculty offices, pay approximately 
$630 to $ 1 800 for the nine-month session depending upon job 
responsibility and the number of hours actually worked. In- 
quiries should be directed to the Office of Admissions and Finan- 
cial Aid. 

FIELD TRIPS 

Field trips in individual courses may be initiated by a professor 
when the activity is an integral and necessary part of the re- 
quired classwork. The College does not however, excuse 
students from classes that may be missed while participating in 
a field trip. Therefore, all trips must be planned at a time when 
participating students will not miss other classes, except as they 
may voluntarily choose to do so. 

FOOD SERVICES (Dining Hall, College Shop, Vending Machines) 

All residential students pay for complete meal service— three 
meals a day, seven days a week. Day students may pay the full 
semester charge and receive meal privileges. Meals are served in 
Seacobeck Hall. 

Hours of Seacobeck Dining Hall 

Monday-Friday 

Breakfast 7 a.m. -8 a.m. 

Late Breakfast 8a.m.-10a.m. 

(Continental breakfast) 

Lunch 11 :45 a.m.-1 p.m. 

Dinner 5 p.m. -6 p.m. 

Saturday-Sunday 

Breakfast 8 a.m. -9 a.m. 

Late Breakfast 9a.m.-10a.m. 

Dinner 1 2:30p.m. -1 :30p.m. 

Supper 5 p.m. -6 p.m. 



22/College Services 



Residential students may bring guests to the dining hall and 
pay cash for the guest's meal upon entering the cafeteria line. 
Meal Prices for Guests: 

Breakfast $1.65 

Lunch 2.25 

Dinner (including mid-day Sunday) 2.75 

Premium Entree Meal 4.00 

The College Shop, consisting of a pub and a short-order grill, is 
located in Ann Carter Lee Hall. The shop is open to all members 
of the College community and their guests. 

Hours of "C" Shop 

Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-1 1 p.m. 

Saturday 12 noon-1 1 p.m. 

Sunday 5p.m.-10p.m. 

Snack foods and soft drinks are available also from vending 
machines in residence halls and most academic buildings. 

Board Adjustments - Internship & Student Teachers 

Residential students participating in internship or student 
teaching programs may receive a credit for the meals they must 
miss. The necessary forms can be obtained from the director of 
the program, and must be submitted to the Office of the Comp- 
troller prior to the commencement of the program in order to 
receive credit. 

IDENTIFICATION CARDS 

Each student is provided an identification card and is required 
to present it for admission to the dining hall, library and College- 
sponsored events, as well as for check-cashing purposes. The ID 
card is revalidated each semester for the student who is atten- 
ding the College. The card is the property of the College and is 
not transferable, and falsification of data is an Honor Code of- 
fense. The cards are color coded: blue, residential student; 
yellow, commuting student; orange, part-time communting stu- 
dent; white, faculty; green, full-time employee; pink, part-time 
employee. Part-time staff and students are not eligible for 
recreational use of Goolrick Hall, student body activities or 
campus-wide parties. A charge of $5 is made to replace a lost 
card. A charge of $ 1 is made to replace a damaged card. A stu- 
dent who withdraws must surrender his card to the Office of 
Student Records. 



College Services/23 



INFIRMARY 

The infirmary, located in Mercer Hall, provides, in general, 
emergency and diagnostic service and treats minor medical and 
surgical problems for residential students. Prolonged treatment, 
involved tests for complex symptoms, specialty services and 
routine physical examinations are referred to the family physi- 
cian at home or to appropriate specialists in Fredericksburg. The 
infirmary does not provide for birth control measures, but 
counseling on methods of birth control and information on 
where to obtain birth control measures are available to students 
upon request. 

Provisions are made for students to be seen and examined by a 
physician Monday through Friday on a schedule published in the 
College Bulletin. There is always a physician available on 
24-hour call for emergencies and during weekends. Registered 
nurses are on duty 24 hours daily while the College is in session. 

Arrangements for routine, emergency, or specialized dental 
care by local dentists, orthodontists or dental surgeons can be 
made through the infirmary. 

Admission to the infirmary any time of the day or night may be 
recommended by the physician, nursing staff, Counseling 
Center, Dean of Students or by student request. 

A student confined as a bed patient in Hugh Mercer infirmary 
may not take final examinations there. 

All incoming residential students must have on file in the infir- 
mary a form reporting the results of a recent physical examina- 
tion. Once received, these records are considered confidential 
and are available only to the medical staff. 

After 1 1 p.m. the infirmary is locked, and a student must call 
before coming to the door. If the nurse is not at the door upon ar- 
rival, there is a lighted doorbell to ring. IF TRANSPORTATION IS 
NEEDED TO THE INFIRMARY, THE NURSE ON DUTY MUST BE 
CALLED, AND SHE WILL MAKE THE NECESSARY ARRANGE- 
MENTS (Ext. 206). 

LAUNDRY 

Coin-operated washers and driers are available in the 
residence halls. 

LIBRARY 

The E. Lee Trinkle Library contains more than 250,000 
volumes, most of which are located in stacks open to Mary 
Washington College faculty, staff and students. A library hand- 
book entitled The Resources and Services of E. Lee Trinkle 



24/College Services 



Library is made available in the Library to each student. In the 
handbook can be found information and procedures concerning 
the arrangement of the Library and the use of its materials. In 
order to make the Library more meaningful to the student, a one- 
credit course covering bibliographical sources and research pro- 
cedures is offered each semester. 

Rules governing the use of the Library are contained in the sec- 
tion on College Regulations. 

LOST AND FOUND 

The Lost and Found Service is administered by the College 
Police, Ann Carter Lee Hall. Students are urged to mark all 
belongings for ease in identification. All items found anywhere 
on campus should be turned in to the College Police between the 
hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Lost items 
will be held for 30 days and then discarded, given to appropriate 
charities, sold at auction or, if requested, the original finder may 
claim the item. Anyone losing an item may use the College 
Bulletin to advertise the loss. Such notices should be submitted 
in writing to the Office of Information Services. 

MALE HOUSING ON WEEKENDS 

Limited overnight facilities for male guests are available in Ann 
Carter Lee Hall. This service is available only on Friday and Satur- 
day nights. Reservations must be made in advance in the Office 
of Student Activities (ACL Hall). Only one reservation per stu- 
dent is allowed. Guests may register and make payment ($3 per 
night) between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. on the evening they arrive. 
Male day students may rent a bed on a space available basis. 
Reservations for a given weekend will not be taken before the 
Monday of that same week. Rules concerning the housing of 
male guests can be found in the section entitled College Regula- 
tions. 

RECREATIONAL USE OF GOOLRICK HALL, TENNIS COURTS 
AND PLAYING FIELDS 

The recreational facilities of Goolrick Hall, the tennis courts, 
and playing fields are available for use by students, faculty 
members and employees when they are not in use for instruc- 
tional or organized purposes. Permission for such use must be 
obtained in writing from the Chairman of the Department of 
Health and Physical Education. 

Goolrick Hall has an indoor swimming pool, a main and aux- 
iliary gymnasium, a weight lifting room, handball / racquetball 



College Services/25 



court, indoor archery targets, a golf cage and sun decks. The 
times available will vary, but, in general, recreational use is from 
6 p.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 1 p.m. to 5 
p.m. on weekends. (Swimming is permitted only when a 
lifeguard is on duty.) 

Procedures for the recreational use of Goolrick Hall are under 
College Regulations. 

TELEPHONE SERVICE 

The telephone number of the College is Area Code (703) 
373-7250. Each residential student will be given the extension 
number of the hall telephone nearest his or her room. Pay 
telephones are located on most floors of the residence hall, and 
these may be used by students for long-distance calls. Only local 
and prepaid calls may be received through the switchboard. The 
switchboard is open from 7 a.m. to 1 2 midnight on Monday 
through Friday and from 8 a.m. to 1 2 midnight on Saturday and 
Sunday. Incoming calls are received only during these hours. 
Emergency calls after the closing of the switchboard are handled 
by the Dispatcher in the Office of College Police. 

The telephones in the residence hall office are for official use 
and are not to be used by the students. Hall telephones are to be 
shared by everyone, and specific regulations for sharing may be 
established by the students of each residence hall. 

Westmoreland Hall and the small houses are the only 
residence halls wired to allow the installation of personal 
telephones. Contracts for private lines in these halls must be 
made directly by the student with the telephone company. 

A Faculty-Staff Directory containing the home and office 
telephone numbers of College faculty and staff personnel will be 
distributed in the fall to each front desk and extension telephone 
in the dormitories. Students should consult this directory before 
calling the switchboard for extension numbers. If an extension 
number is not listed or cannot be found, students may call Exten- 
sion 461 for telephone information. To receive a replacement 
directory, students should inquire at the Mail Room located in 
the basement of George Washington Hall. 



College 
Regulations 



Mary Washington College is a community of scholars. As 
such, it must have rules and regulations so that each member of 
the community may live and work in a comfortable and produc- 
tive environment. Because the College community is not 
isolated from other larger communities, it is also necessary for 
the entire College community including each member of the 
faculty, staff, student body and administration to abide by ap- 
plicable Federal and State laws. 

An environment of mutual trust is essential to the well-being 
of an academic community. As a result, the Honor System was 
created and has functioned successfully for many years on the 
campus of Mary Washington College. The philosophy of the 
Honor System, the Honor Constitution and related policies and 
procedures are described in this Handbook so that each member 
of the College community will understand fully his or her respon- 
sibility to the system. 

An academic community should promote maximum oppor- 
tunities for self-government. To this end, the College ad- 
ministration has delegated broad authority to the Student 
Association for the supervision and control of student life in the 
Residence Halls. 

All students of the College are members of the Student 
Association which is dedicated to promoting the standards and 
objectives of the College. The Association participates in the 
establishment of rules and regulations regarding certain aspects 
of the College operations, especially those in regard to residence 
halls, and has assumed responsibility for enforcing these and 
certain other College regulations. These rules are presented later 
in the section under the heading Student Rules. 



College Regulations/2 7 



Administrative 
Regulations 



Since the president of the College is charged with the respon- 
sibility for the regulation of all aspects of student life at the Col- 
lege, the College administration must insure that the campus en- 
vironment remains safe, comfortable and supportive of the ob- 
jectives and standards of the institution. The regulations con- 
tained in this section are for this purpose. 

All students and other members of the College community are 
expected to uphold standards which reflect credit to themselves 
and the institution and to abide by all College rules and regula- 
tions. Should the conduct or action of a student, or group of 
students, be detrimental to the environment of the College, or in- 
terfere with the educational process or the operation of the in- 
stitution, the president of the College is charged by the Board of 
Visitors to take such disciplinary action as he deems ap- 
propriate, including dismissal. 

ABSENCES FROM CLASS 

A student unavoidably absent from class for a week or more 
because of hospitalization, serious illness, or sudden emergen- 
cy, should notify the advising office by telephone (Extension 
294) of the situation. 

ACCIDENT REPORTS 

It is important that the residence director or administrative 
aide be notified immediately when an accident occurs involving 
injury to a residential student either off or on campus. The 
residence director or administrative aide will inform the Office of 
the Dean of Students. 

When there has been injury of any kind, the student may seek 
medical aid in the College Infirmary. 

ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING 

The Board of Visitors has charged the president of the College 
with the responsibility for student discipline and the regulation 
of the various aspects of student life at the College. The Presi- 




28/ College Regulations 



dent has delegated to the Student Association authority for 
supervising many phases of student life, including the formula- 
tion and enforcement of a number of mutually-agreed-upon 
regulations. There are other regulations, however, for which the 
administration of the College must maintain primary respon- 
sibility for enforcing. In addition, violations of local, state and 
federal laws are subject to criminal prosecution by these bodies. 

In situations where the administration may take the initial 
disciplinary action, the student accused of a violation will be pro- 
vided the opportunity for a hearing before an Administrative 
Hearing Board prior to final action being taken by the College. 
Generally this administrative hearing will take place prior to the 
College taking any disciplinary action; however, if the violation 
of which the student is accused is one that may result in criminal 
prosecution or is of a nature that may endanger or bring disrup- 
tion to the College operation, the student may be suspended 
from the College until such time as the hearing can be scheduled. 

The purpose of the hearing is to provide the Administrative 
Hearing Board with a full account of the circumstances and facts 
involved. The hearing is not a judicial proceeding. 

The Administrative Hearing Board shall have full authority to 
determine the disciplinary action, if any, to be imposed upon the 
student except, however, when the board determines the stu- 
dent should be expelled from the College. In this instance the 
presiding officer of the hearing board shall brief the president of 
the College on the circumstances and findings prior to the action 
of the hearing board becoming final. If for any reason the presi- 
dent of the College concludes that a penalty of suspension 
would be more appropriate than expulsion, the president may 
accordingly amend the decision of the Administrative Hearing 
Board. 

The following procedures will be observed in regard to the ad- 
ministrative hearing: 

1 . The President of the College will appoint three (3) College 
administrators to constitute an Administrative Hearing 
Board and will designate one (1 ) to serve as the presiding 
officer to convene and preside at the hearing. 

2. The student charged with a violation will be notified in 
writing of the charge and the date, time and place of the 
hearing and the members of the Administrative Hearing 
Board. 

3. Should there be more than one student charged with joint 
participation in a violation, each student will be provided 
the option of having an individual hearing. 



College Regulations/29 



4. The student may have any witnesses he or she may wish 
to speak in his or her behalf and he or she may, at his or her 
own expense, have an attorney. 

5. The College may have in attendance an attorney and any 
witnesses it deems appropriate to present and substan- 
iate the charge. 

6. The president of the Student Association and the judicial 
chairman of the Student Association or their designees 
shall be present as observers. 

7. The presiding officer shall provide for the proceedings of 
the hearing to be tape recorded solely for the purpose of 
providing the President of the College a record of the hear- 
ing in the event the student may appeal the decision of the 
Administrative Hearing Board. The presiding officer shall 
maintain the hearing tape for the period of time the stu- 
dent is allowed to make an appeal. If an appeal is made, the 
presiding officer shall provide the President of the College 
with the tape. If an appeal is not made within the time allot- 
ted, the presiding officer shall erase the hearing proceed- 
ings from the tape. 

8. The hearing procedure shall consist of the presiding officer 
calling the hearing to order and stating the charge(s). The 
College will then present such witnesses as it deems ap- 
propriate. The accused will then make such statements as 
he or she desires regarding the charge and present his or 
her witnesses. When all parties have presented their facts, 
the presiding officer shall adjourn the hearing, and as soon 
thereafter as possible the Administrative Hearing Board 
shall arrive at a decision. The accused will be notified ver- 
bally and in writing of the decision and disciplinary action, 
if any, to be imposed. 

Appeal Procedures 

A student found guilty of a violation and assigned a punish- 
ment by the Administrative Hearing Board may, within two days 
after notification of the action of the Board, appeal the decision 
in writing to the President of the College on one or both of the 
following grounds only: 

1 . The accused was denied procedural due process as speci- 
fied for the Hearing 

2. The punishment was too harsh for the offense committed. 
In the written appeal, the student shall set forth all his or her 

objections to the action of the Hearing Board. Upon receipt of 
the Appeal, the President shall request the tape of the hearing 



30/College Regulations 



from the presiding officer, shall listen to the recording of the 
hearing, may ask clarifying questions of the accused student, 
members of the Hearing Board, or of any other individuals testi- 
fying at the hearing, and shall then render a decision on the ap- 
peal and communicate the decision in writing to the student. The 
action of the President shall be final. 

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

The Code of Virginia states that persons between the ages of 
18 and 21 may purchase, possess and consume only beer. 
Those 21 and older may purchase, possess and consume other 
alcoholic beverages. The purchase, possession and consump- 
tion of beer under the age of 1 8 and other beverages under the 
age of 21 are unlawful acts. The Code further states that con- 
sumption of any alcohol in public, except in duly licensed 
establishments, or being intoxicated in public are unlawful acts. 
The transferrance of alcoholic beverages to secondary con- 
tainers does not make public consumption legal. Violations of 
these laws will be handled by the College Police. 

The College defines the student's room as private and the "C" 
Shop, Ballroom, and Pool Room as duly licensed establishments. 
Anyone purchasing beer in these facilities will be required to 
show a College Identification Card. All other areas on the cam- 
pus and in the residence are public and non-licensed; therefore, 
it is unlawful to consume alcohol in these spaces except when 
prior approval has been obtained from the Dean of Students. 
Beer is the only beverage permitted in party areas by College 
policy. 

Acceptable standards of conduct at Mary Washington College 
include obeying the laws of the State of Virginia. 

AUTOMOBILE REGISTRATION AND PARKING REGULATIONS 

The general rules for registration of student automobiles and 
parking regulations are shown below. Full information is provid- 
ed in a brochure available upon request from the Office of Col- 
lege Police. 

1 . All student cars, whether parked on campus or kept in 
town, including those operated by Day Students, must be 
registered with the College Police (ACL Hall) when the 
student registers for classes or within 48 hours should the 
vehicle be brought on campus after classes begin. Cars 
may be registered at any time during the school year, how- 
ever all student registrations expire annually on Septem- 
ber 1 and must be renewed prior to that time. The College 



College Regulations/3 1 



registration sticker must be prominently displayed on the 
left rear bumper immediately after issue. 

2 . Any student automobile operator under age 1 8 must have 
on file as a requirement of registration a signed statement 
from a parent or guardian indicating knowledge and com- 
prehension of the regulations and granting the student 
permission to operate a motor vehicle at Mary Washington 
College and in the City of Fredericksburg. 

3. The Office of College Police is to be advised when a vehicle 
is no longer owned or operated by the person to whom the 
registration sticker was issued, and the sticker must be re- 
moved from the car. Any changes in make, model or 
license numbers must also be reported. 

4. The privilege of parking a car on campus is given only to 
students classified academically as Junior or Senior Resi- 
dential Students, or Day Students. Other students produc- 
ing evidence of need for transportation due to illness or 
disability may request permission in advance from the Of- 
fice of College Police to park cars on the campus. Such re- 
quests, whether for temporary or full-term parking per- 
mits, will be considered on their individual merits. 

5. Parking spaces on Campus Drive and near each building 
are reserved for employees between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. Qualified students may use des- 
ignated areas, although the College cannot guarantee 
space for anyone. (Cars parked on College Avenue or 
Sunken Road should be on the College side of these public 
streets in deference tc other property owners. Vehicles 
parked on the city streets must be moved every 48 hours.) 
Any student may park at any time in the lot adjacent to the 
Power Plant on College Avenue provided the car has a cur- 
rent MWC registration sticker. 

6. Fines, payable to the College, will be assessed for parking 
violations, for failure to register vehicles, for improper dis- 
play of decals, etc. 

7 . The College reserves the right to withdraw the privilege of 
car registration, or not to issue a parking permit, if it be- 
lieves such action is in the best interest of the student and 
of the College. 

8. The College assumes no responsibility for the care or pro- 
tection of any vehicle or its contents at any time. A person 
operating a vehicle on the campus assumes full responsi- 
bility for meeting legal requirements and for any liability or 
damage claims. 



32/College Regulations 



9. The motor vehicle regulations of Mary Washington Col- 
lege are in effect at all times, including vacation periods. 
Enforcement is the responsibility of the College Police. 

BABYSITTING 

Students may not perform this service within the individual 
residence halls. No children or babies may be brought to the 
residence hall or campus for babysitting purposes. 

BAD CHECK CHARGE 

A $7.50 charge will be assessed against any member of the 
College Community for any check presented to any office or ele- 
ment of the College which is returned marked "not paid due to 
insufficient funds." 

BICYCLES 

Procedures for registering and storing bicycles on campus are: 

1 . All bicycles must be licensed in accordance with the regu- 
lations of the City of Fredericksburg and the College 
Police. 

2. Riders may not use campus or city sidewalks. 

3. Bicycles must be parked in designated areas at each resi- 
dence hall. 

4. Bicycles may not be stored or parked in hallways, door- 
ways or on porches. 

5. Between the first and second semesters and during the 
semester vacations, students may store their bicycles in 
their rooms. 

6. Very limited space is available for storage of bicycles dur- 
ing the summer months. 

7. Bicycles should be securely locked to racks when not in 
use. 

8. Bicycles abandoned for 30 days will be donated to charity 
or sold at auction. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

A student must report a change in mailing and/or home ad- 
dress immediately so that the College can notify proper persons 
in cases of emergency and correctly mail grade reports and bill- 
ings. 

Changes in address occurring before the beginning of the 
academic session should be reported to the Dean of Admissions 
and Financial Aid. 

Changes in address occurring during the academic session 
should be reported to the Office of Student Records. 



College Regulations/33 



CHANGE IN RESIDENCE 

Any student desiring a room change involving College housing 
must obtain prior approval from the Office of the Dean of 
Students. Each case will be considered on its individual merits. 

Students desiring a change of residence involving leaving Col- 
lege housing for private housing or vice versa must seek ap- 
proval from the Dean of Students. Normally, requests to move 
from residence halls received after July 2 are not approved. 

CLEARANCE FOR ON-CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVES 

If a student wishes to represent an outside firm to the Campus 
Community, he or she must obtain a form requesting clearance 
to do so from the Office of the Dean of Students. The form must 
be approved prior to the student's beginning actual employ- 
ment, and will be kept on file in the Office of the Dean of 
Students. 

CLOSING HOURS OF RESIDENCE HALLS 

The outside doors of all residence halls are locked at midnight 
Sunday through Thursday and at 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. 
A student returning after the closing hour may, upon presenta- 
tion of proper identification to the Office of College Police, ob- 
tain a key to gain entrance to his or her residence hall. See 
"Keys" under the Student Rules section in this Handbook. 

COOKING AND IRONING 

Cooking in a residence hall is permitted only in kitchenettes. 
Any food kept in student rooms must be in metal or plastic con- 
tainers with tight lids. Ironing is permitted only in designated 
pressing rooms. 

DRUGS 

The use, providing for other's use, manufacture, merchandis- 
ing, or possession of drugs without a doctor's prescription is 
prohibited by Federal and State laws and by the College. Posses- 
sion of drug paraphernalia on the campus is prohibited by the 
College. Violations of these rules may result in suspension or ex- 
pulsion from the College, as well as prosecution by the civil 
authorities. 

For the purpose of this regulation, drugs are defined as in- 
cluding marijuana, hashish, amphetamines, LSD compounds, 
mescaline, psilocybin, DMT, narcotics, opiates and other 
hallucinogens except when taken under a physician's prescrip- 
tion in accordance with the law. Drug paraphernalia includes but 



34/College Regulations 



is not limited to bongs, roach clips, pipes, hypodermic syringes 
and needles. 

An innocent student who observes his or her roommate 
violating College drug regulations may absolve himself or herself 
of being implicated in the violation by following the procedure 
stated below: 

1 . Request the roommate to remove drugs and/or drug relat- 
ed paraphernalia from their room. 

2. If the request is denied by the roommate the residence 
hall president will be notified and it will be his or her re- 
sponsibility to request removal of such material. 

3. If both requests are denied the residential director will be 
notified by the Residence hall president and the room- 
mate. This action relieves them from any further College 
responsibility. 

EDUCATIONAL RECORDS 

Federal regulations under the Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act of 1 974 require that the College inform students and alumni 
of the rights afforded them by the Act. The following summary 
of Public Law 93-380 has been prepared so that each student 
may have an opportunity to become familiar with the provisions 
of this legislation. The law stipulates that students who are at- 
tending or who have attended the College (and the parents of 
some special status students) have the following rights: 

1 . To be provided a list of the types of educational records 
maintained by the College and relating directly to stu- 
dents; 

2. To inspect and review the contents of these educational 
records; 

3. To obtain copies of these records upon payment of the 
cost for reproduction and processing; 

4. To be provided with the name and position of the official 
responsible for maintenance of each type of record, and 
with an identification of persons who have access to the 
records and the purposes for which these persons may 
have access; 

5. To be informed of the policies of the College for reviewing 
and expunging these records; 

6. To receive from the College an explanation of these re- 
cords upon reasonable request for such explanations; 

7 . To obtain a hearing for challenging the content of these re- 
cords; 



College Regulations/35 



8. To be informed of the categories of information which the 
College has designated as "Directory Information" under 
this Act; 

9. To have the educational records treated in a confidential 
manner by the College. Neither the records nor the per- 
sonally identifiable information contained therein, other 
than directory information, will be released without writ- 
ten consent of the student to any party other than those 
specifically authorized by the Act. 

A. Types of Educational Records Maintained by Mary 
Washington College: 

1 . Admission Records — These records are maintained by 
the Dean and Assistant Dean of Admissions and Finan- 
cial Aid, Mr. H. Conrad Warlick and Mr. G. Forrest Dick- 
inson, Jr. and by the Vice President, Mr. A. Ray Mer- 
chent, and may contain the following information: 

a. Application for admission 

b. Secondary school or previous college transcripts 

c. Letters and statement of recommendation 

d. Standardized test scores 

e . Application supplement (after July, 1 974) 

f . Letter of offer of admission 

g. Residential or nonresidential student form 
h. Correspondence 

(Note: Upon enrollment, these records become part of 
the Academic Record.) 

2. Academic Records — These records are maintained by 
the Vice President for Administration and Planning, Mr. 
William M. Anderson, Jr., the Dean and Assistant Deans 
for Academic Advising and Career Services, Miss Mary 
Ann T. Burns, Mrs. Cornelia D. Oliver and Mr. Ronald B. 
Head, and may contain the following information: 

a. Permanent record of College grades 

b. Transcript of credits transferred to MWC 

c. Government forms pertaining to foreign student 
immigration status 

d. Forms and correspondence pertaining to a student's 
academic record 

e. Student-teacher evaluation forms 

f . Record of progress toward the degree 

g. Student schedules and registration information 

3. Financial Aid Records — These records are maintained 
by the Dean and Assistant Dean of Admissions and 



36/College Regulations 



Financial Aid, Mr. H. Conrad Warlick and Mr. G. Forrest 
Dickinson, Jr., and may contain the following informa- 
tion: 

a. Aid application and supporting financial statements 

b. Award analysis form 

c. Financial aid award letters and conditions of award; 
acceptance of award forms 

d. Correspondence 

e. Academic information 

f . Standardized test scores 

g. Student employment records 

4. Student Non-Academic Records — These records may 
contain the following information and are maintained by 
the respective College officials as listed: 

Dean of Students, Miss Suzanne Gordon 

a. Personal Data Sheet 

b. Disciplinary Records 

c. Residence Hall Assignments 

d. College transfer forms 

e. Student-requested letters of recommendation 

f . Student Activity Sheets 

g. Correspondence 

Director of the Counseling Center, Mrs. Mary A. 

K. Kelly 
h. Counseling Records 
i. Psychological Test Results 
j. Correspondence 

Chief, Campus Police, Mr. Daniel W. Bishop 
k. Security Records 

5. Student Health Records — These records are maintain- 
ed by the College Physician, Dr. lima Overman, and may 
contain the following information: 

a. Medical information form 

b. Record of admission to Hugh Mercer Infirmary 

c. Record of medical visits to the Infirmary 

d. Reports of Consultants 

e. Results of tests and treatments for illnesses and 
accidents 

6. Student Financial Records — These records are main- 
tained by the Comptroller, Mr. Edward V. Allison, Jr., 
and may contain the following information: 

a. Student accounts 

b. Record of financial aid 

c. NDSL notes 



College Regulations/37 



d . Student employment payroll files 
7. Placement Records — These records are maintained by 
the Assistant Dean for Career Services, Mr. Ronald B. 
Head and the Director of Career Placement Services, 
Miss Isabel Gordon, and may contain the following in- 
formation: 

a. Placement Bureau Registration forms 

b. Contract with Placement Bureau 

c. Resume 

d. Statements of Recommendation 

e. Student-Teacher Evaluation Forms 

f . Letters of job offers/rejections 

g. Residential information sheet 
h. Interview form 

i. Personal data summary sheet 

B. Persons Having Access to Educational Records 

1 . The College will not permit access to or the release of 
educational records without the written consent of the 
student or eligible parent to anyone other than the fol- 
lowing: 

a. College officials who have been determined by the 
College to have legitimate educational interests; 

b. Officials of other schools or school systems in which 
the student seeks or intends to enroll, upon the con- 
dition that the student be notified of the request, 
receive a copy of the record if desired and have an 
opportunity to challenge the content of the record. 
(See MWC policies below.) 

c. Officials pursuant to their statutory responsibilities: 

1 . the Comptroller General of the United States; 

2. the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare; 

3. the Commissioner, the Director of the National 
Institute of Education or the Assistant Secretary 
for Education; 

4. State educational authorities; 

d. Any party legitimately connected with a student's 
application for, or receipt of, financial aid; 

e. State and local officials or authorities to which such 
information is specifically required to be reported or 
disclosed pursuant to State statute adopted prior to 
November 19, 1974; 

f. Organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf 
of, educational agencies or institutions for the pur- 



3 8/ College Regulations 



pose of developing, validating, or administering 
predictive tests, administering student aid pro- 
grams, and improved instruction; 

g. Accrediting organizations, for the purpose of carry- 
ing out their accrediting functions; 

h. Parents of dependent students as defined in section 
1 52 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1 954; 

i. Parties acting under authority of a judicial order or 
pursuant to any lawfully issued subpoena, upon con- 
dition that students are notified of all such orders or 
subpoenas in advance of the compliance therewith 
by the educational institution; 

j. Appropriate persons in connection with an emergen- 
cy if the knowledge of such information is necessary 
to protect the health or safety of a student or other 
persons. 

2. Any person may have access to "directory information" 
as defined by Mary Washington College under the 
authority of the Act, unless the student informs the 
custodian of the records containing such information 
that any or all of such information should not be released 
without the student's prior consent. "Directory infor- 
mation" includes "a student's name, address, 
telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of 
study, participation in officially recognized activities 
and sports, weight and height of members of athletic 
teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards receiv- 
ed and the most recent previous educational agency or 
institution attended by the student." 

3. Medical and Counseling Center records are not included 
in that category of records open to inspection; however, 
such records may be personally reviewed by a physician 
or other appropriate professional of the student's 
choice. 

4. Custodians are not required to give access to financial 
records of parents or any information contained therein, 
nor are they required to give access to confidential let- 
ters and statements of recommendation which were 
placed in the educational records prior to January 1 , 
1 975, or to which the student has waived the right of 
access. 

C. Maintenance, Availability, Interpretation, and Disposal of 
Records 

1 . The College does not permit access to or the release of 



College Regulations/39 



educational records to officials of other schools or 
school systems, except for cooperative programs, 
without the written consent of the student. 

2. Custodians of educational records maintain an updated 
list of the types of such records they keep, and have es- 
tablished procedures for granting access to such re- 
cords, except those excluded by the Act. These pro- 
cedures provide for: 

a. Inspection and review by students and eligible par- 
ents of the content of such records within a reason- 
able time, not to exceed 45 days, from date of re- 
quest; 

b. Copying of such records at the expense of the stu- 
dent or eligible parent, but not to exceed the actual 
cost of reproduction (provided such records are not 
available at their original source outside the College); 

c. A response from the custodian to reasonable re- 
quests for explanations and interpretations of such 
records; and 

d. An opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content 
of such records. Such hearing shall: 

1 ) Be held and decided within a reasonable time; 

2) Be conducted by an official who does not have a 
direct interest in the outcome; 

3) Be conducted so as to afford a full and fair oppor- 
tunity to present evidence; and 

4) Be concluded by a written decision within a 
reasonable time after the hearing. 

3. Challenges to records may be made only on accuracy 
and not on judgements, e.g., the accuracy of the record- 
ing of a grade, but not the grade itself. 

4. Custodians of education records will from time to time, 
at their discretion, review and expunge such records, 
unless prior to destruction the student, or eligible par- 
ent, has requested access. 

Note: 

Any student wishing to have "Directory Information" 
withheld from College release should contact the appropriate of- 
fice(s) as noted above in writing. "Directory Information" is 
defined by Mary Washington College under the authority of the 
Act as "a student's name, address, telephone listing, date and 
place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially 
recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members 



40/ College Regulations 



of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards 
received and the most recent previous educational agency or in- 
stitution attended by the student." 

FIREARMS 

The possession, carrying, use or threatened use of firearms, 
including ammunition and explosives, on campus by other than 
authorized law enforcement personnel is prohibited. Violators 
will be prosecuted by the civil authorities. 

FIRE DRILLS AND SAFETY 

Fire drills are held throughout the school year in each 
residence hall by the Residence Hall Fire and Safety Chairman 
under the direction of the Student Association Campus Fire and 
Safety Chairman. (Fire drills shall not be held for the purposes of 
punishment or pranks.) Printed instructions for fire drill pro- 
cedures are issued to the occupants of each room in the 
residence hall. Each hall resident should, however, determine for 
himself or herself the location of the fire extinguisher and fire exit 
nearest his or her room. 

Fire Emergency Procedure 

1 . Notify immediately the residence hall director or desk aide 

2. Call the fire department emergency line (Ext. 432) to re- 
port as clearly as possible the location of the fire 

3. Leave the building according to fire drill procedure 

For safety, drying racks, trunks, suitcases or any obstruction 
may not be placed in hallways, steps, or doorways. Special locks 
or chain locks on doors are not permitted. 

For reasons of safety, students are advised to avoid dimly 
lighted areas on campus such as the tennis courts, the rear of du- 
Pont Hall, the infirmary, and the library. Students should report 
any incidents immediately to the College Police (Ext. 234). 

FURNISHINGS FOR RESIDENCE HALL ROOMS 

The furnishings provided by the college consist of a bed, mat- 
tress, chest of drawers or a dresser-desk, and chair. Not includ- 
ed are pillows, blankets, linens, towels, study lamps, irons, cur- 
tains, or bedspreads. No furnishings in students' rooms, 
lounges, parlors, or any other areas of the dormitory may be 
removed without prior permission from the residence hall direc- 
tor. Students are not permitted to construct / build any items 
such as lofts, bunks, etc., in any room or any other areas of the 
dormitory. 



College Regulations/4 1 



GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES FOR RESOLVING ALLEGATIONS 
OF DISCRIMINATION 

Mary Washington College is committed, by policy of the Board 
of Visitors dated February 11,1 978, to the concepts of equal 
employment and educational opportunities for all persons. It is 
recognized, however, that allegations of discrimination may 
arise and that procedures for addressing them in a prompt, 
orderly, and equitable manner should be available. The pro- 
cedures which follow outline the processes and steps which 
have been established by the College to address specific allega- 
tions of discrimination. 

Scope of the Procedure 

This grievance procedure is available to any student at Mary 
Washington College who feels that he or she has been 
discriminated against by one or more persons serving in an of- 
ficial capacity for the College, which alleged action directly or in- 
directly negatively affects the education or work activity of the 
individual and which can be corrected by the College. The com- 
plaint or allegation must be based on one or more of the follow- 
ing discriminatory factors: race, color, religion, physical disabili- 
ty, national origin, political affiliation, marital status, sex, or age 
(except where sex or age is a bona fide occupational qualifica- 
tion). This procedure is designed specifically for resolving mat- 
ters of alleged discrimination as may be applicable to Title IX of 
the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1 973, and other requirements. 

Complaints of students concerning Judicial and Honor pro- 
cedures and violations, student disputes with faculty members 
over marks or grading policies, and student campus housing 
policies that specify same sex roommates and single sex or 
coeducational residence halls shall be referred to other 
established procedures for resolution. If discrimination is a part 
of the allegation, the other established procedures will be utiliz- 
ed. 

Procedures 

Step One. A student with a complaint must consult in person 
with the College AAEEO Officer or, in his absence, his designee 
within 10 working days after the event that gave rise to the 
alleged violation. 

For this meeting, the student must complete and sign an M WC 
Form D-1 (secured from the AAEEO Officer and returned to that 
office) providing the following information: 



42/College Regulations 



1 . The basis for alleged discrimination (sex, race, age, etc.). 

2. A clear statement of the facts upon which the complaint is 
based, including an explanation of how the student has 
been adversely affected. 

3. An identification of the person(s) or the College policy or 
procedure considered responsible for the alleged discrimi- 
nation upon which the complaint is based and an explana- 
tion of why the person(s) is considered responsible or why 
the College policy or procedure is considered improper. 

4. A copy of any pertinent Board of Visitors or College poli- 
cies or regulations, state statutes, contractual agree- 
ments, or other documents of custom or practice upon 
which the complainant relies. 

5. A statement of the specific relief sought. 

One purpose of this meeting is for the College AAEEO Officer 
to determine whether or not the allegation is one which comes 
within the purview of these procedures. The decision as to 
whether the complaint is covered by these procedures or is pro- 
perly covered under other procedures shall be made entirely by 
the AAEEO Officer and announced to the complainant in writing 
within 1 working days after the initial meeting. 

If the allegation is one that is within the purview of these pro- 
cedures, the AAEEO Officer will review all of the facts provided 
by the complainant and will thoroughly investigate the alleged 
discrimination. The findings of the investigation and the propos- 
ed resolution will be communicated in writing to the complainant 
within 10 working days after the AAEEO Officer received the 
completed MWC Form D-1 . 

Step Two. In the event a student complainant is not satisfied 
with the Step One resolution, the individual may request a Com- 
plaint Panel hearing within five working days after receipt of the 
Step One decision. The request for a Panel hearing shall be made 
on a Step Two Complaint Form obtained from the College 
AAEEO Officer and returned to him once it is completed. On the 
Step Two Complaint Form, the complainant will provide the 
following information: 

1 . A list of witnesses to be present at the panel hearing. 

2. The identification of any counsel, adviser, or observer to 
be present at the hearing. 

This Step Two Form, together with the Step One Complaint 
Form, will constitute the formal application for a Step Two Com- 
plaint Panel hearing. The AAEEO Officer shall transmit these 
forms to the president of the College within five working days 



College Regulations/43 



after receipt of them. 

The president shall appoint a three member panel composed 
of two full-time administrators and one full-time faculty 
member. The panel shall then elect a chairman from its ranks and 
set a date, time, and place for the hearing which shall not be 
more than 1 working days after it is selected. The student shall 
be notified of the hearing date, time, and place. Before the hear- 
ing, the AAEEO Officer will supply the panel members with 
copies of the complaint forms. After the hearing, the panel will 
submit its recommendation to the president of the College for his 
consideration and station. The president shall notify all parties of 
his decision within five working days after receipt of the recom- 
mendation of the panel. Procedures for conducting the hearing 
are given later in this document. 

Step Three. If the president's decision is not acceptable to the 
complainant, the individual may appeal the decision to the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Board of Visitors. To accomplish this, 
the complainant shall present to the president within 1 working 
days following the receipt of the president's decision a written 
request addressed to the rector for a hearing by the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Visitors. Within 30 days after receipt 
of a request from a complainant, the rector shall have the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Board of Visitors review the record of 
the panel hearing and render a decision and notify the complai- 
nant. 

The decision of the Executive Committee shall be final in all 
determinations relating to the College position on the complaint. 
Failure to comply with the decision of the Executive Committee 
or reprisals as a result of the decision shall be cause for 
disciplinary action. 

The conduct of the hearing shall be as follows: 

1 . The panel shall determine the propriety of attendance at 
the hearing of persons not having a direct interest in the 
hearing. 

2. The panel may, at the beginning of the hearing, ask for 
statements clarifying the issues involved. 

3. The hearing shall be recorded by tape, and a copy of the 
tape may be supplied to the complainant at his or her re- 
quest for the cost of the tape. 

4. Exhibits, when offered by the complainant or the College, 
may be received in evidence by the panel and, when so re- 
ceived, shall be marked and made part of the record. 

5. The complainant and College official, or their representa- 
tives, shall present their claims and proofs and witnesses, 



4 4/ College Regulations 



who shall submit to questions or other examination. The 
panel may, at its discretion, vary this procedure but shall 
afford full and equal opportunity to all parties and witness- 
es for presentation of any material or relevant proofs. 

6. The parties may offer evidence and shall produce such 
additional evidence as the panel may deem necessary to 
an understanding and determination of the dispute. The 
panel shall be the judge of relevancy and materiality of the 
evidence offered. All evidence shall be taken in the pre- 
sence of the panel and of the parties. 

7. The panel will operate on the basis of a simple majority 
vote. 

8. When all claims, evidence, and proofs are received from 
both parties, the panel shall deliberate in privacy and trans- 
mit its recommendation within five working days after the 
hearing to the president of the College. The president shall 
notify all parties of his decision within five working days 
after receipt of the recommendation of the panel. 
NOTE: With consent of both parties, the panel may ex- 
tend any or all of the time periods established in 
this procedure. 

All questions relating to discrimination should be 
addressed to A. R. Merchent, Vice President and 
AAEEO Officer, Room 213 George Washington 
Hall, telephone (703) 373-7250, Extension 
214, or write to Box 3575 College Station, Fred- 
ericksburg, Virginia 22401 . 

Nothing in the complaint procedure shown in this 
document is intended to prohibit an individual 
from filing in writing an allegation of discrimina- 
tion with the Office of Civil Rights, Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, 
D.C. 20201. 

GROUP PARTIES 

For definitions and procedures pertaining to Group Parties, 
see the section with the same heading under the Student Rules 
section of this chapter. 

GUESTS 

Anyone in a residence hall to which he or she is not assigned a 
room by the College is considered a guest. 



College Regulations/45 



For full definitions and procedures pertaining to Guests, see 
the section with the same heading in the Student Rules section 
of this chapter. 

KEYS 

Keys to an individual student's room door, and in certain 
residence halls, closet keys, are available to the student assign- 
ed the room and are issued by the Residence Hall Director. All 
keys are to be returned to the Residence Director upon 
withdrawal or at the end of the school term. A charge of $2 is 
made against the account of the student who loses or fails to 
return each key issued. See "Residence Hall Keys" in the Stu- 
dent Rules section of this chapter. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

A student who intends to be away from campus for one or 
more semesters may request a leave of absence from the Office 
of the Dean. Leaves of absence are classified as: 

1 . Study leave, for a student who leaves to study at another 
college or university on a program fully approved by Mary 
Washington College for transfer credit toward a Mary 
Washington degree. 

2. Definite leave, for a student with the definite expectation 
of return. 

3. Indefinite leave, for a student who does not have definite 
plans but who wishes to keep in touch with the College. 

LIBRARY 

General Rules 

Security Control. As a measure of personal security, the 
library maintains a check-point at the door. A student or a 
member of the College community entering the library must be 
prepared to present to the attendant at the door his or her Col- 
lege ID card. A visitor, upon entering the library, is asked to sign 
a register, giving his or her name, address and reasons for 
visiting the library. 

As a means of assuring that no library materials are in- 
advertently or intentionally removed from the library without be- 
ing properly charged out, each person leaving the building is re- 
quested to show the attendant all books and printed materials in 
his or her possession. Persons carrying briefcases, or any bag 
large enough to contain books or magazines, are requested to 
open these for routine checking by the attendant. 



4 6 '/College Regulations 



Smoking of Tobacco. Smoking is permitted only in the smok- 
ing lounge known as Foggy Bottom on the ground floor. Because 
of the fire hazard, smoking is not allowed in reading rooms or 
stack areas. 

Food and Drink. To keep reading and study areas insect free 
and as clean as possible, food and drinks are not allowed in the 
building. 

Circulation Rules 

1 . A student must present his or her ID card when borrowing 
a book from the library. Since he or she assumes responsi- 
bility for all books charged to his or her card, the loss of the 
ID card should be reported immediately to the library. 

2 . A book is loaned for a period of three weeks and may be re- 
newed so long as no other reader has placed a hold on it. 
To be renewed, a book must be returned to the library. 

3. A hold may be placed on a book that is in circulation. If re- 
quested, this book will be recalled after it has circulated for 
two weeks. 

4. The borrower is responsible for the replacement of lost or 
damaged library materials. 

5. A fine of five cents per day is levied on all overdue books 
and phonograph records. 

6. Two notices will be sent as reminders that a book is over- 
due. If it becomes necessary to send a third overdue no- 
tice, a service charge of $2 will be levied in addition to the 
overdue fine. 

If an overdue book has not been returned within one 
week after the third overdue notice is sent, the replace- 
ment cost of the book (or a minimum of $ 1 0) is forwarded 
to the Office of the Comptroller where the amount is post- 
ed against the borrower's account. Should the book(s) be 
returned after the charge is entered on the account, the Of- 
fice of the Comptroller credits the student's account with 
the full amount, except for a $5 charge to defray book- 
keeping costs. 

An exception to the sending of three overdue notices is 
made at the end of each fall and spring semester. Since all 
books charged to students are due on the last day of 
exams, a student will be billed for a book not returned by 
the date due^even though it is impossible to have sent 
overdue notifications for the book. 

7. No more than three phonograph records may be borrowed 
at one time. The period of loan is five days, renewable un- 



College Regulations/4 7 



less a hold has been placed on the record. 

8. Periodicals must be used in the building. They may, by 
special arrangement, be borrowed for class use. 

9. There are special rules for borrowing books from the re- 
serve room. 

a. Overnight reserve books may be charged out one hour 
before closing. They are due one-half hour after the 
Library is open for business the following day. A re- 
quest to borrow the overnight book may be submitted 
at any time on the day the book is to be borrowed. 

b. Three-day reserve books may be charged out at any 
time and are due at 8:30 a.m. on the fourth day (9:30 
a.m. on Saturday and 1 :30 p.m. on Sunday). 

c. Seven-day reserve books may be charged out at any 
time and are due at 8:30 a.m. on the eighth day (9:30 
a.m. on Saturday and 1 :30 p.m. on Sunday). 

d. Reserve books may not be renewed. 

e. The fine on an overdue reserve book is twenty-five 
cents for the first hour and ten cents for all succeeding 
hours during which the Library is open. 

Interlibrary Loans 

For students in advanced research oriented courses, the 
Library will provide interlibrary loan services if, in the opinion of 
the student's professor, the materials desired are absolutely 
essential to his or her studies. Books that are currently in print at 
moderate cost should not be requested on interlibrary loan. 

MAIL 

Students must rent a post office box directly from the College 
Station, a federal post office facility adjacent to the campus on 
College Avenue. The post office also serves area residents. 
Students must advise all correspondents and the College's Of- 
fice of Student Records of their box numbers, since this is the 
only provision for personal mail. Special Delivery and UPS items 
must be addressed to the student at a specific residence hall to 
insure delivery. 

The College provides daily delivery of on-campus mail to ad- 
ministrative and faculty offices. A box for on-campus mail is 
located in the mail room for each residence hall. It is the respon- 
sibility of the head desk aide to check his or her residence hall's 
box daily and deliver any mail accumulated in it to the proper stu- 
dent. Students who wish to send letters to an administrative or 
faculty office may leave them with the head desk aide or bring 
them to the mail room. There is no charge for on campus mail 



48/College Regulations 



delivery. 

MALE HOUSING ON WEEKENDS IN ANN CARTER LEE HALL. 

Below are shown the regulations pertaining to housing of male 
guests on weekends in facilities provided in Ann Carter Lee Hall. 

Reservations are made in the Office of Student Activities in 
ACL. Reservations may not be made prior to Monday of the 
week the guest is to use the facility. Registration and payment 
for lodging are made in the Office of College Police in ACL. 

1 . The per night occupancy charge is $ 3 payable in advance. 
This fee provides an assigned bunk bed with sheets, blank- 
et, pillow, pillowcase, towel and soap. Occupancy may 
begin at 5 p.m., Friday and 3 p.m., Saturday. Single night 
guests must vacate the room by noon the following day. 
All occupants must vacate the room from noon to 3 p.m. 
daily to permit cleaning. 

2. The College assumes no responsibility for the loss of per- 
sonal property or belongings of the occupant. 

3. The occupant will not deface, damage, destroy or remove 
furnishings, bedding, towels or other equipment from the 
room and bath area. The occupant is liable for damage to 
or removal of furnishing from the room. 

4. The occupant will admit no one to the room and under- 
stands that no visitation or personnel other than paid regis- 
tered guests and College employees are allowed in the 
room. 

5. The occupant will use only the bed assigned to him. 

6. The occupant fully understands and acknowledges that 
College employees will be in the room from time to time. 

7. Disruptive conduct or noises which interfere with activi- 
ties in the building are not permitted. From midnight until 8 
a.m., the occupant will refrain from noises or actions 
which might disturb others who may be sleeping. 

8. In the event any disorderly conduct, disruptions, indica- 
tions of danger, etc., develop in the room, the occupant 
will contact the College Police immediately. 

9. Reservations will not be held after 8 p.m. Those without 
reservations, including male MWC commuting students, 
may secure accommodations, if available after 8 p.m. on a 
first come first served basis. 

NOTICE TO LEAVE PREMISES 

The Code of Virginia (18.2-129) states: 

"Any person, whether or not a student, directed to leave the 
premises of . . . any institution of higher learning by a person 



College Regulations/49 



duly authorized to give such direction and who fails to do so shall 
be guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor. Each day such person re- 
mains on the premise after such direction shall constitute a 
separate offense." 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Full payment of fees and tuition must be received by the due 
date, for a student to be permitted to register for classes. Any 
student whose full account, including charges such as library 
fines and lost book charges, infirmary charges, parking tickets, 
and lost key charges, is not settled at the end of a semester will 
not receive grades, transcripts, graduate, or be eligible to return 
to the College until the account is settled or satisfactory ar- 
rangements are made to settle the obligation. 

Full payment of the continuance fee before the published 
deadline date is necessary before a student may select a residen- 
tial room for the following year. 

A student's transcript will be withheld in the event their NDSL 
account is in a past due or delinquent status. 

PERMISSIONS 

1 . Permission must be obtained from the Residence Hall Di- 
rector or person in charge of the hall for a guest of the op- 
posite sex to enter a student's room except during visita- 
tion. This also applies to residents in coeducational hous- 
ing. 

2. Permission must be obtained from the Dean of Students 
for: 

a. changes in room assignments and residential or com- 
muting classifications; 

b. remaining in the Residence Hall until Commencement 
(unless a candidate for graduation) or beyond the 
designated period halls are open after examinations; 

c. private residence hall parties or group parties in other 
approved locations on campus when alcoholic 
beverages will be served; 

d. room-to-room selling by students in the residence 
halls; 

e. group parties in approved locations on campus; and 

f. banquet licenses for group parties. 

3. Permission must be obtained from the Office of Student 
Records to withdraw from the College. 

4. Permission must be obtained from the Office of the Dean 
of the College for the use of academic facilities (space and 



50/College Regulations 



equipment). 

5. Permission must be obtained from the Office of Student 
Activities (ACL Hall) for the use of non-academic facilities 
(space and equipment). 

6. Permission must be obtained from the Director of the 
Physical Plant ior group transportation under College aus- 
pices by College-owned buses and vehicles. 

RECREATIONAL USE OF GOOLRICK HALL 

Below are shown the procedures to be followed for the recrea- 
tional uses of facilities in Goolrick Hall: 

1 . A student, faculty member or full-time employee must 
deposit his or her ID card and sign-in with the person on 
duty at the south entrance to Goolrick. At sign-in, the user 
must write his or her name, the time and the area to be 
used for recreational purposes. (Only persons holding 
blue, yellow, white, or green validated ID cards may use 
the facility.) 

2. A student, faculty member or full-time employee may 
bring one guest. The guest must be signed in and accom- 
panied at all times by the student, faculty member or full- 
time employee. 

3. Upon departing Goolrick, the student, faculty member or 
full-time employee must sign out by placing the time of de- 
parture adjacent to his or her name, and reclaim ID card. 

4. Abuses to these procedures which may include damage to 
facilities or theft of equipment either by the student, facul- 
ty member, full-time employee or by a guest of one of the 
above may result in loss of privileges, compensation for 
losses, dismissal from the College, termination of employ- 
ment or other penalties as deemed appropriate. 

5. Specific hours for use of the swimming pool, main and 
auxiliary gymnasiums, paddle ball court and weight rooms 
are posted each semester. 

Students are reminded that the tennis courts and playing 
fields are available for recreational use when not utilized for 
class or intercollegiate teams, only after written permission has 
been obtained from the Chairman of the Department of Health 
and Physical Education. 

SALES 

Sales conducted by outside commercial or charitable 
organizations may not be conducted in the residence halls. 
Deliveries and collections may not be made to individual student 



College Regulations/5 1 



rooms by non-students. 

SIGNS-NOTICES-BANNERS-ADVERTISEMENTS 

No signs, notices, banners, advertisements, etc., shall be 
posted or displayed anywhere on campus except on bulletin 
boards within the buildings or on the outdoor bulletin boards in 
front of the Library and at Seacobeck Hall and on the tables in 
Seacobeck Hall, except, however, that signs and notices 
associated with student elections may be displayed on the out- 
side of Lee Hall and the various residence halls consistent with 
provisions of the Student Association policies regarding election 
procedures. 



STUDENT HOUSING CONTRACT 

Student housing is available under the following contract 
terms: 

College residential accommodations are available only for students classified 
by the College as having full-time student status. Only College assigned oc- 
cupants may reside in dormitory rooms or houses. A student must occupy the 
room assigned by the Office of Dean of Students, and may not change a room 
assignment without permission from this Office. In case of withdrawal during 
the academic year the student is required to vacate his / her room within forty- 
eight (48) hours after the withdrawal date. 

No overnight visit(s) are permitted in any room by members of the opposite 
sex. 

Each student is issued a key to his / her room for the duration of this contract. 
The College is not liable for loss of or damage to any personal property belonging 
to a student. The furnishings provided by the college consists of a bed, mattress, 
chest of drawers or a dresser-desk, and chair. Not included are pillows, blankets, 
linens, towels, study lamps, irons, curtains, or bedspreads. No furnishings in 
students' rooms, lounges, parlors or any other areas of the dormitory may be 
removed without prior permission from the Residence Hall Director. Students are 
not permitted to construct / build any items such as lofts, bunks, etc., in any 
room or any other areas of the dormitory. 

Provisions for storage of trunks and large suitcases are made in each residence 
hall, and all articles must be labeled with student's name and room number 
before being stored. 

The following items are prohibited in student rooms: air conditioners, personal 
refrigerators over sixty watts, cooking and heating appliacnces, exterior radio or 
TV antennas, firearms, ammunition, firecrackers, or similar explosives, kegs of 
beer, and illegal drugs. No occupant or visitor is permitted to collect and / or 
assemble, any amount of flammable material which could constitute a fire 
hazard anywhere within the dormitory area; nor is an occupant or visitor permit- 
ted to kindle any type of fire within the dormitory other than a match or lighter for 
the purpose of lighting cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. No animals or pets except 
fish, are permitted anywhere in the dormitory. The College Police will remove 
pets from the campus with the costs borne by the student violating the regula- 
tion. 



5 2/ College Regulations 



Each student is responsible for the general condition of the premises assigned 
to him or her, including damages, defacement, and general cleanliness. Charges 
for damages or defacement will be assessed the occupants, and must be paid 
promptly. Charges for damages to or defacement of any area in common use, 
such as bathrooms, lounges, recreation rooms, parlors, or corridors, may be 
assessed equally against residents in the affected area. Any condition amoun- 
ting to a sanitation hazard shall likewise be remedied at the expense of the 
responsible resident(s). 

If for any reason a student's roommate withdraws from the room, the student 
remaining in the room, with the approval of the Dean of Students, may have the 
privilege of one week to seek another roommate of his / her choice. After this 
period the College will make an assignment to fill the vacancy. 

Guests in a Residence Hall must sign a guest book in the Residence Hall office. 
A guest is defined as any person in a Residence Hall to which he or she is not 
assigned a room by the College. Mary Washington College students of the same 
sex are not required to sign the guest book unless attending a group party in the 
Residence Hall. Guests of the opposite sex (maximum three (3) per student 
assigned to the room) may visit in a room only during the specified hours of visita- 
tion. Guests are not permitted in Residence Halls during Reading Days. During 
the Examination Period upperclass residence halls, with proper petition submit- 
ted to the Dean of Students, may have visitation. Overnight guests of the same 
sex visiting in the residence hall must be registered in the guest book and may re- 
main no longer than two (2) consecutive nights. 

Members of the immediate family of a student (father, mother, sisters, 
brothers, grandparents) may visit a student in his / her room at any time until the 
closing hour of the residence hall. 



Soliciting and peddling in the residence halls are prohibited, except with prior 
written permission of the Dean of Students. Collection from, or deliveries to, in- 
dividual student rooms, are not permitted. 

Opening and closing dates and times to begin and terminate room occupancy 
are specified in the College Calendar and must be observed. Residence Halls will 
be closed during vacation periods and no student will be permitted to remain in a 
residence hall during these periods. 

Between semesters and during the first and second semester vacation periods 
students may store their bicycles in their rooms. 

Change of Status from Dormitory to Commuting Student: 777© deadline date 
for changing status from dormitory student to commuting student is July 2, 
1 979. All requests for changing status must be made in writing and received by 
the Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid by 5:00 p.m. on July 2. A residential 
accommodation is reserved for each student who files a Declaration to Continue 
Card as a dormitory student and who is assigned a space in College housing. Any 
student who changes from dormitory to commuting status after July 2 and prior 
to the opening of the College will be required to pay the room fee for the first 
semester 1979-80. A student who abandons a room during a semester, to 
reside off campus, will be charged room and board for the remainder of the 
semester. The Dean of Students may exempt a student from the contract in ex- 
treme circumstances. 

The College reserves the right to (1 ) change any room assignment or rate; (2) 
enter any room for routine or emergency maintenance, cleanliness inspections 
and other valid causes; (3) control use of rooms in the event of an epidemic; and 
(4)terminate the housing contract for violation of any of the provisions of this 
contract including visitation or for other reasons deemed sufficient by the Dean 



College Regulations/53 



of Students. 

In keeping with the College policy, housing assignments are made without 
descrimination by reason of race, color, religion, national origin, age, marital 
status, or political affiliation. 

I have read and understand the above provisions and agree to abide by all Col- 
lege rules and regulations as stated in the Housing Contract which I accept as 
binding for the academic year. 



SMOKING OF TOBACCO 

Smoking is not permitted in the library (except in a room 
designated for that purpose), in George Washington, duPont 
and Monroe auditoriums or in the gymnasium, locker rooms or 
swimming pool area of Goolrick Hall. Smokers in any of these 
areas may be asked to leave by any member of the College com- 
munity. Failure to leave when asked may result in punishment. 

Smoking is permitted in classrooms unless there is a specific 
objection from the instructor or a class member. 

TRASH DISPOSAL 

Trash in a residence hall is to be deposited in designated areas 
and is removed on a regular schedule. Students are expected to 
remove trash from their rooms and deposit it in designated 
areas. 

TRUNKS 

Small chests or uncovered footlockers that can be incor- 
porated in the room furnishings are permitted in student rooms. 
Large trunks must be labeled and stored in the trunk room. 
Trunks, footlockers and suitcases maybe left in College storage 
rooms over the summer, tagged in accordance with instructions 
from the Dean of Students. Provisions do not exist for summer 
storage of items not contained in trunks, footlockers, and suit- 
cases. No boxes or loose items can be stored. The College 
assumes no liability for stored items. 

USE AND SCHEDULING OF COLLEGE FACILITIES 

The guidelines for assignment and use of institutional space 
by students and faculty are outlined below: 

1 . College space may be used by any student or group of stu- 
dents when it does not disrupt academic activities, 
scheduled events, College functions, or other normal pur- 
suits that take place in the area and when such use is not 
physically destructive or unlawful. 

2. The Dean of Students in cooperation with those who have 
reserved space, may develop and make available, in ad- 



5 4/ Co I lege Regulations 






vance, specific provisions to govern student conduct at a 
given event. 

3. The Office of Student Activities or other College personnel 
are authorized to ask any student using or occupying Col- 
lege space in an adverse way or engaging in disruptive 
conduct to leave. The person may incur disciplinary action 
by the College or prosecution by the civil authorities. 

4. Space must be reserved at least 10 days in advance of 
use. Reservations for space must be made with the appro- 
priate administrative official ,as well as listed with the Of- 
fice of Student Activities. 

Dean of the College— Academic buildings (all spaces with- 
in Combs, Chandler, duPont, Goolrick, Melchers, Monroe, 
and Pollard Halls, including Klein Theatre in duPont Hall) 
Outdoor academic instructional areas (tennis courts and 
playing fields) 

Dean of Students— All spaces in all residence halls and 
houses 

Student Recreation Room, lower level, Seacobeck Hall, 
Ball Circle, Westmoreland Circle, and all other outdoor 
areas adjacent to residence halls and houses 
Amphitheater 
Hugh Mercer Infirmary 
Log Cabin 

Office of Student Activities— Ann Carter Lee Hall; and the 
Auditorium, George Washington Hall 
Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid — Conference 
Room, third floor (Room 309), George Washington Hall 
Librarian— All spaces in the Library 

President— Board Room, first floor (Room 105), George 
Washington Hall 

Anne Fairfax House, Ann Fairfax Annex 
Reserve Parlor, ACL 

5. Individuals or groups using College facilities or equipment 
are required to return them in satisfactory condition. A 
maintenance charge will be assessed for equipment re- 
turned uncleaned or facilities left in disorder. 

6. All non-College individuals, organizations, and groups de- 
siring the use of College facilities must submit their re- 
quests in writing to the Office of the Vice President of the 
College, Room 213, George Washington Hall. This in- 
cludes the use of space requested by College personnel for 
any off campus organization or group. 

The procedures for scheduling College space are: 



College Regulations/55 



a. Request from the Office of the Vice President of the 
College a date, time, and place for the event to be 
scheduled. This must be done at least 1 days prior to 
the event. Once the request has been approved, the Of- 
fice of Student Activities should be provided with infor- 
mation about the event suitable for an announcement 
of the event in the College Bulletin. 

b. Provide the Office of Student Activities with a list of the 
equipment and supplies needed for the event. 

c. Should the event be cancelled, notify immediately the 
individual with whom the space was scheduled and the 
Office of Student Activities. 

d. The sponsoring organization or individual will be billed 
for food and beverages requisitioned for the event. 

USE OF THE MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE NAME 

No member of the College Community, student or faculty 
group, club or organization, or non-college group or individual 
may use "MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE" as a part of its title, 
name, or designation or in the title or name of any publication 
without prior written approval from the President of the College. 

VISITATION 

For rules and regulations pertaining to Visitation, see the sec- 
tion with the same heading under the Student Rules section of 
this chapter. 

WITHDRAWALS 

There are two types of withdrawals from the College; volun- 
tary, in which the student initiates the action; and involuntary, in 
which appropriate authority at the College initiates the action. 
1 . Voluntary. A student who elects to withdraw from the 
College during a semester must report to the Office of the 
Dean of the College to obtain forms and instructions. 
The withdrawal procedure consists of the following: 

1 ) Completion of the Official Withdrawal from the Col- 
lege form 

2) Clearance from designated officials of the College 

3) Payment of all outstanding financial obligations to the 
College 

4) Submission of the Parental Authorization to With- 
draw, if applicable 

5) Return of the I.D. card (and key to the Day Student 
Lounge, if applicable) to the Office of the Dean of the 



5 6 '/College Regulations 



College. 
No grades for the semester will be recorded on the per- 
manent record; however, a notation of withdrawal and the 
date will be made. A student having officially withdrawn 
from the College may be readmitted with the academic 
standing held at the end of the last semester of completed 
work unless otherwise stipulated by the Dean of the Col- 
lege. 
2. Involuntary. A student who is required to withdraw from 
the College by the Dean of the College or by action of the 
Honor Council, Joint Council or as a result of an Adminis- 
trative Hearing, must report with an official from the ap- 
propriate Council or from the Administration to the Office 
of the Dean of Students. Withdrawal procedures will be 
initiated and completed by that office. 

A student who withdraws under accusation of an honor 
violation must report with an Honor Council representa- 
tive to the Office of the Dean of Students where with- 
drawal procedures will be initiated and completed. 
A student who is expelled by action of either the Joint Council, 
Honor Council or an Administrative Hearing or one who 
withdraws under accusation of an honor offense is not eligible 
for readmission and is not permitted to return to the campus. 

Fees will be adjusted based on the date the withdrawal re- 
quest is submitted or the date the premises are vacated, 
whichever is later. 



Student Rules 



The College Administration has delegated to the Student 
Association responsibility for enforcing visitation regulations 
and a variety of other regulations pertaining to the operation of 
the residence halls. Full opportunity will continue to be given to 
the Association to fulfill this responsibility, and it is expected 
and anticipated that it will do so. However, should this delegated 
responsibility in regard to the enforcement of regulations, in- 
cluding visitation, not be effectively implemented by the Stu- 
dent Association, the College Administration will act in such 
manner as it deems appropriate to insure enforcement. 

The following rules have the mutual agreement of the Student 
Association, the Office of the Dean of Students and the Presi- 



Student Rules/57 



dent of the College. The Judicial Court, with the cooperation and 
assistance of all residents, has the responsibility to implement 
and enforce regulations. 

Each residence hall is supervised by a College official who is 
responsible to the Dean of Students. The official, or his or her ap- 
pointed representative, must remain on duty in the building at all 
times. In addition, each of the residence halls is under the 
general supervision of a representative of the Student Associa- 
tion who is the House President. The House President in each up- 
per class residence hall is elected by the residents in the spring 
for the following session and is responsible to the Student 
Association and to the residents. He or she has the following 
responsibilities: 

1 . scheduling a meeting of the hall at the beginning of the 
year and explaining the regulations of the College and the 
Student Association; 

2. assisting residents in determining whether or not they 
wish to establish additional regulations for their particular 
hall or house; 

3. guiding and counseling occupants in the housing unit 
when conflicts or problems arise; and 

4. handling grievances within the particular housing unit. 

CLOSING HOURS, RESIDENCE HALLS 

1 . All residence halls are locked by the Residence Director or 
person in charge at the following times: Sunday through 
Thursday— 1 2 midnight; Friday and Saturday — 2 a.m. 

2. A student leaving the residence hall after the closing hour 
is urged to notify the Office of College Police of his or her 
leaving. A student who leaves a residence hall after the 
closing hour must leave the residence hall from the main 
entrance, and then leave the campus immediately. 



DAY STUDENTS LOUNGE 

A lounge exclusively for the use of day students has been 
established in Ann Carter Lee Hall. 

Rules and regulations for use of the Day Students Lounge 
have been established by these students. Failure to observe 
these regulations will be handled by the day student's of- 
ficers—specifically the Judicial Chairman in consultation with 
the Campus Judicial Chairman. Penalties may include official 
warnings, fines, and / or loss of lounge privileges. As members 
of the Mary Washington College Community, the day students 




58/Student Rules 



are responsible for all the rules and regulations of the College. 
Any violation of the visitation regulations by a residential stu- 
dent or day student will be handled by the Campus Judicial 
Chairman. 
Rules for the Use of the Day Students Lounge: 

1 . Alcoholic beverages are not allowed in the Day Students 
Lounge, except when officially declared private for the 
purpose of having a party. 

2. Individuals are responsible for cleaning up their own areas, 
i.e. coke bottles, "C" Shop dishes, etc. 

3. Loud or abusive language will not be tolerated. 

4. Physical abuse of furniture will result in prompt corrective 
action and payment for damages. 

5. Radio or stereo volume must be at moderate levels. 

6. Residential students are allowed in the Lounge only when 
accompanied by a day student. 

7 . The use of the Day Students Lounge by any student club or 
organization must be approved by the Day Student Execu- 
tive Council 1 4 days prior to the date of the event. 

DESK DUTY 

To cover the residence hall desk during those hours when paid 
Desk Aides are not on duty every hall resident is required to 
serve some time on desk duty. This procedure was established 
as a condition for present visitation privileges. Any resident 
refusing to cooperate with this system will have all privileges of 
the front desk and visitation suspended for a period of time 
specified by the House Council. A system of Hail Offenses pro- 
vides punishments for infractions such as failure to report for du- 
ty at the assigned time. 

DRINKING OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

Intoxication or consumption of alcoholic beverages in public 
violates Virginia Statute, and violations will be handled by the 
College Police. The applicable Virginia laws governing drinking 
and possession of alcoholic beverages are stated under the Col- 
lege Regulations shown elsewhere in the Handbook. 

Students are responsible for their behavior at all times 
regardless of their physical state. Any student whose behavior is 
offensive, disruptive, or destructive, whatever the cause, 
violates the acceptable standards of student conduct at Mary 
Washington College. 

Infractions in residence halls or the Day Students Lounge will 
be referred to the Campus Judicial Court or Joint Council of the 



Student Rules/ 5 9 



Student Association — and punishment could result in suspen- 
sion or expulsion for flagrant and / or chronic violations. Infrac- 
tions elsewhere on campus are handled by the College Police. 
The Judicial System is concerned only with the student's 
behavior and not with the cause of such behavior. 

GROUP PARTIES 

The students of a residence hall may request that a public area 
of that residence, the basement room of Seacobeck Hall, or 
Ballroom of Ann Carter Lee Hall, be declared "private" for the 
purpose of holding a party at which beer is to be served. The re- 
quest for use of any of these areas must be made to the Dean of 
Students. 

In case of conflict between two organizations for use of 
Seacobeck or Ann Carter Lee Halls, consideration will be given 
to that organization which has had the least number of functions 
to date. Because the official function of Class Council is to plan 
social activities for the entire campus, it has priority over other 
organizations which require the use of Seacobeck or Ann Carter 
Lee Halls. When a campus-wide activity is planned by Class 
Council, no other similar social activity (residence hall party, 
club or organization party) may be held simultaneously. 

Residence Halls 

The following procedure shall be followed for a residence hall 
party (as used here the term residence hall refers to all occupants 
of the hall): 

1 . A form providing a list of details of the party must be 
completed and submitted to the Dean of Students at 
least seven days before the event. 

2. In consultation with the Residence Director or Adminis- 
trative Aide, the House Council must give its endorse- 
ment to the plan. 

3. The students of the residence hall must be informed of 
the specifics, and a vote of approval must be obtained 
from 80 per cent of the entire population of the hall. 

4. Copies of the plan must then be submitted to the Dean of 
Students. 

5. The residence hall president or vice president and the 
hall judicial chairman or designated hall officers must be 
within the hall to ensure that a party functions properly. 

6. During these "private" parties, a student may enjoy per- 
sonal visitation in his or her own room. To implement 
this, a second sign-in point must be established to regis- 



60/Student Rules 



ter guests for visitation. In addition, hall officers are to 
ensure that no student or guest may enter or leave a par- 
ty or a residence hall room carrying an opened container 
of alcoholic beverage. 

7. The maximum numbers of individuals permitted in the 
party areas of the residence halls are listed below. 

These maximums were derived by a joint committee 
composed of the House Council in each hall and three 
members of the College administration. The numbers 
refer to the total individuals permitted in the area at any 
time. The areas designated for parties are the foyers and 
parlors unless otherwise noted. 

Ball 250 

Custis Recreation Room . 100 

Brent 55 

Bushnell 175 

Recreation Room 75 

Framar 75 

Hamlet House 15 

Jefferson 200 

Madison (Basement only) 110 

Marshall 200 

Marye 35 

Mason 225 

Recreation Room 200 

Randolph 225 

Recreation Room 175 

Russell (upper and lower combined) 200 

Trench Hill . . . . 40 

Virginia 200 

Recreation Room 50 

Westmoreland (Basement only) 200 

8. Expenses incurred for a party are the responsibility of 
those sponsoring it. No admission fee, collections at the 
door or donations at the party will be permitted. 

9. Residential hall parties may be scheduled for Friday and 
Saturday nights and the night preceding an official Col- 
lege break and the first reading day. Each time a resi- 
dence hall wishes to declare itself "private," it must fol- 
low the above procedure. 

1 0. Group parties will not be permitted during reading days, 



Student Rules/6 1 



examinations or during the period from the end of exami- 
nations to Commencement. 
1 1 . Group parties at which no alcoholic beverage is being 
served (birthday, shower) and other social functions 
should be held with all due consideration of other resi- 
dents. 

Seacobeck Hall— capacity 450 

The basement room of Seacobeck Dining Hall may be reserved 
for private parties by any established and recognized College 
organization, club, residence hall or unit thereof, provided ap- 
propriate approval is first obtained through the Office of the 
Dean of Students. Admission may be charged to these parties; 
however, a banquet license must be obtained by the reserving 
group for the serving of beer. Requests to the proper state of- 
ficial for a licence must be submitted at least 14 days in ad- 
vance. Appropriate procedures regarding the use of this facility 
are the responsibility of the Office of the Dean of Students. 

Ann Carter Lee Hall 

Ballroom — capacity 950 

Pool Room— to be determined 

The Ballroom and the Pool Room of Ann Carter Lee Hall may be 
reserved for parties by any established and recognized College 
organization, club, residence hall or unit thereof, provided ap- 
propriate approval is first obtained through the Office of the 
Dean of Students. Groups holding parties in the Ballroom may 
charge admission. Beer to be served at these parties must be ob- 
tained through the "C" Shop, and personnel must be employed 
to serve the beer. Appropriate procedures regarding the use of 
this facility are the responsibility of the Office of the Dean of 
Students. 

GUESTS 

Definition 

A guest is defined as any person in a residence hall who is not 
assigned a room in that residence hall by the College. (For regula- 
tions on the hosting of guests of the opposite sex, see section on 
Visitation). 

Sign in Procedure for Guests 

A guest who is not a MWC student must always be signed in. 
Any MWC student visiting a member of the opposite sex must be 



62/Student Rules 



signed in. All guests, male or female, must be signed in when at- 
tending a Group Party. 

A student must sign in each of his or her guests into the Guest 
Book by signing his or her own name as host or hostess, giving 
the time at which each guest entered the residence hall, the sex 
of the guest, and the number of the guest. The student must also 
sign the guest out by recording the time of the guest's departure, 
and the initial of the host or hostess. 

Disclosure 

The Desk Aide has the right to stop and question any person 
entering the residence hall to determine his or her purpose for be- 
ing there. 

A student is required to, upon request, provide the full name of 
his or her guest to any of the following authorities: 
Residence Hall Directors College Administrators 

Desk Aides College Police 

Residence Hall Officers Judicial Chairmen 

Honor Council & Contacts Student Association Officers 

Residential Assistants 

Responsibility 

A. All guests must abide by the rules and regulations of the 
College at all times and are liable for any damage they may 
cause to any property. 

B. Each student is responsible for the behavior of his or her 
guests and is liable for any damage to property caused by 
his or her guests. 

Family Visitors 

Members of the immediate family of a student may visit a stu- 
dent in his or her room at any time until the closing hour of the 
residence hall. 



Special Days 

Non-students (excluding members of the immediate family) 
and guests of the opposite sex will not be permitted to visit a stu- 
dent's room during Reading Days, examination days, and those 
days from the end of examinations through Commencement. 
However, should the residents of an upperclass hall wish to have 
visitation during examinations they must submit an affirmative 
petition signed by 80% of the hall residents to the Dean of 
Students at least two work days before the first examination. 



Student Rules/63 



Overnight Guests 

An overnight guest must be of the same sex as his or her host 
or hostess. Each overnight guest must be signed in the Guest 
Book giving his or her full name, date entering the hall, and name 
of his or her host or hostess. An overnight guest may remain no 
longer than two consecutive nights unless given special permis- 
sion from the Dean of Students. 

PENALTIES FOR VIOLATIONS OF STUDENT 
ASSOCIATION RULES AND RESIDENCE HALL OFFENSES 

1 . In cases involving minor infractions of the rules, the stu- 
dent is dealt with by means of the system of automatic 
punishments (hall offenses) within the judicial department 
of the Student Association. Administered by the Resi- 
dence Hall Judicial Chairman or the Campus Judicial 
Chairman, punishments cover Student Association and 
residence hall offenses and are not cumulative from one 
session to another. 

The President of the Student Association, the Campus 
Judicial Chairman orthe Residence Hall Judicial Chairman, 
at his or her discretion, may require a student to appear be- 
fore the Campus Judicial Court for one or more infractions 
of the rules. 

The penalty for the accumulation of more than three hall 
offenses will be handled by the Campus Judicial Chair- 
man in consultation with the Residence Hall Judicial Chair- 
man. Action taken may range from a letter of warning, to a 
possible fine up to $ 1 0, to a possible trial before Campus 
Judicial Court. 

2. The following are designated as infractions by the Judicial 
Court: 

a. After one warning, refusal to observe study hours in 
the residence unit or hall 

b. After one warning, continuing to disturb others 

c. Not signing guests of the opposite sex in/out properly 

d. Leaving guests of the opposite sex unaccompanied in 
other areas than public parlors 

e. Leaving doors open after hours 

f. Having a member of the opposite sex in room and/or 
hall when there is no visitation 

g. Refusal to perform desk duty or show up at the assign- 
ed time; and 

h. Any other violations determined by the Campus 
Judicial Chairman to be an infraction. 



64/Student Rules 



In cases involving serious infractions of the rules, the 
Campus Judicial Court or the Joint Council may withdraw 
certain privileges from students who have violated College 
regulations. Punishments range, according to the serious- 
ness of the offense, from the withdrawal of the privileges 
concerned in the infraction, to social probation, to strict 
campusing or a modification thereof or to suspension for 
infractions of a more serious nature. In cases of a very ser- 
ious infraction, expulsion from the College may be in order 
upon recommendation of the Joint Council and approval 
by the President of the College. 
3. Possible punishments include: 

a. Assignment of extra desk hours; 

b. Assignment of the responsibility for checking doors at 
the closing hour; and 

c. Forfeiture of room on campus for a specified period of 
time. This punishment may be recommended if a stu- 
dent ignores major Student Association regulations. 

d. Social Probation. A student placed on social probation 
must appear before the Joint Council if he or she 
violates a major Student Association regulation (e.g. 
visitations or breaking imposed campus penalties) and 
may be subject to expulsion. 

e. Strict Campus. A student who is placed on strict cam- 
pus will be subject to the following: 

1 ) may not have visitors of the opposite sex or be sign- 
ed into another residence hall; 

2) may not attend dances or other all-college recrea- 
tional or social events; 

3) may not visit the C-Shop; 

4) may spend the night only in his or her room; 

5) may not key in after residence halls close; 

6) will be recorded as suspended for the remainder of 
the session if he or she withdraws voluntarily from 
the College. 

f . Suspension: When suspended the student must leave 
campus within 36 hours after the penalty has been im- 
posed and following consultation with the Dean of 
Students. A student suspended from the College may 
not reapply for resumption of his or her studies until the 
designated time and then he or she must do so to the 
Committee on Admissions. 

g. Expulsion: When expelled the student must leave cam- 
pus within 36 hours after the penalty has been impos- 



Student Rules/65 



ed and following consultation with the Dean of 
Students. A student expelled from the College is per- 
manently ineligible for readmission. 

4. Notification of parents. Parents or guardians will be 
notified by the Dean of Students of the violation and penal- 
ty imposed by the Joint Council. In cases involving sus- 
pension or expulsion, the parents or guardians will be noti- 
fied immediately by telephone and by letter from the Dean 
of Students. 

5. Both the Campus Judicial Court and the Joint Council may 
impose penalties other than those listed. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

1 . Members of the opposite sex are allowed in student's 
rooms only with the permission of the Residence Director 
or person in charge, except during visitation hours. 

2. The observance of study hours may be established by 
each upperclass residence hall or unit. Consideration of 
others is expected at all times. Record players and other 
musical instruments should be kept at a volume that can- 
not be heard outside the occupant's room. 

3. The established study hours in all freshman residence halls 
are from 7 p.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday through Thursday. 

4. Strict Study will be in effect during Reading Days and 
examination periods. 

See additional regulations for residence halls listed under 
"Student Housing Contract" in the Administrative Regulations 
section of this chapter. 

RESIDENCE HALL KEYS 

1 . Any student returning to campus after the closing hour 
must obtain a key from the Office of College Police in Ann 
Carter Lee Hall. The person on duty will record the stu- 
dent's name and key number, request that he or she show 
his or her student identification card and require that he or 
she sign for the key. 

No student will be issued a key without an identification 
card. If the student does not have an identification card, he 
or she must call someone to bring it to the Office of College 
Police before a key will be issued. If the student cannot ob- 
tain his or her identification card by this means, he or she 
must call the Residence Hall Director or Administrative 
Aide to admit him or her to the hall. 



66/Student Rules 



Once a key has been issued the student must deposit the 
key in the wooden box placed right inside the main door of 
the residence hall and notify the Office of College Police 
(Ext. 234) of his or her safe return. This should be accomp- 
lished within 20 minutes of the time that the key is issued. 

2. For his or her own safety, a student must enter his or her 
respective hall immediately upon returning to campus 
after the closing hour. 

3. When using the doors after closing hours, a student must 
make sure that the door locks securely behind him or her. 

A student may key into a residence hall other than his or 
her own. In such a situation, the student must give to the 
Office of College Police the name of his or her own resi- 
dence hall and the residence hall to which he or she is go- 
ing. 

4. The following constitute key violations: 

a. failure to notify the Office of College Police of safe arri- 
val to the residence hall within 20 minutes after obtain- 
ing key; 

b. failure to deposit key in appropriate box immediately 
after safe arrival. 

5. A student who does not return the key within 20 minutes 
after entering the residence hall will be dealt with through 
the system of automatic punishments. 

a. For the first offense, the student will receive a written 
warning from the Campus Judicial Chairman. 

b. For the second offense, the student will receeive two 
hall offenses. 

c. For more than three offenses, the student will be dealt 
with individually by the Campus Judicial Chairman 
who will then decide the action deemed necessary. 

6. A fine up to $ 2 5 payable to the College may be given a stu- 
dent who loses a key which has been signed in his or her 
name. Additional punishment may be decided upon by the 
Campus Judicial Chairman. 

7. In order to provide for the safety of the other students, a 
student must not duplicate a key or allow a key to be dupli- 
cated. Such duplication constitutes a fraud, and offenses 
will be dealt with by the Honor Council. 

8. A student who gives his or her key to another person is 
subject to loss of key privileges for the remainder of the 
academic year. 



Student Rules/67 



SEARCHES AND SEIZURES 

1 . Appropriate College personnel may make reasonable in- 
spections of the College premises, including residence hall 
rooms, for maintenance and safety purposes. This, of 
course, would not involve examining the student's per- 
sonal property. No warrant is needed for such an inspec- 
tion. Such inspection should be routine and reasonable no- 
tice should be given. 

2 . If College personnel have reason to suspect a maintenance 
problem of an emergency or reasonably critical nature, 
such as to render notice unfeasible, they may go into a 
residence hall room to investigate and to perform neces- 
sary maintenance. Again, no warrant is needed. 

3. If the College authorities have reasonable cause to believe 
that a College rule is being violated in a manner which pre- 
judices the proper and efficient operation of the College for 
the welfare of the student body generally, the College 
authorities may inspect the student's room for the pur- 
pose of investigating the violation and enforcing the Col- 
lege's rules. If there is reasonable ground for belief that the 
violation is taking place, the search is necessary for the in- 
vestigation of the violation and the enforcement of the 
rule, and action against the offender is limited to adminis- 
trative procedures as distinguished from criminal proceed- 
ings. No search warrant would be required. 

The Dean of Students accompanied by the Residence 
Hall Director and a student hall official should participate in 
such a search. The College Police may assist in such a 
search. 

4. If the search is to be made for the purpose of a police inves- 
tigation of a violation of the criminal law, a search warrant 
must be obtained even though actual prosecution may not 
be contemplated. 

5. There are situations in which searches can be made of pri- 
vate residences without search warrants. Examples of 
these are— the search of the area under the immediate per- 
sonal control of a person being arrested, the invasion of a 
person's home in hot pursuit or a search made when it is 
not reasonably possible to get a search warrant. These are 
all extraordinary situations. 

6. Evidence observed by College personnel under situations 
above may be used in court in a criminal prosecution as 
well as in a College disciplinary proceeding. However, in 
order for this to be the case, the inspections made under 



68/Student Rules 



situations listed above must have been made in good faith 
and not as a subterfuge or excuse to obtain evidence not 
otherwise obtainable. 
7. A residence hall director or his or her designee may open a 
student's room for the student's parent or guardian when 
all the following circumstances occur: 

a. The student cannot be located through normal proce- 
- dures. 

b. The parent or guardian makes an emergency request to 
the hall director (or designee). 

c. The parent or guardian presents proper identification 
to the hall director (or designee). 

SMOKING OF TOBACCO 

Smoking of tobacco is permitted in most areas of the College, 
including classrooms, unless there is a specific objection from 
the instructor or any member of the class. Those who smoke are 
responsible for any damage incurred to College property and are 
expected to comply at all times with safety regulations and 
health standards. 

Smoking is not permitted in: George Washington, duPont and 
Monroe auditoriums and the gymnasium, locker rooms or swim- 
ming pool areas of Goolrick Hall. 

Any member of the college community can ask a smoker to 
leave these areas. Failure to cease smoking when requested to 
do so can result in punishment. 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION FACULTY DINING PLAN 

Students have the privilege of inviting faculty members to be 
their guests at the College dining hall. Student hosts or 
hostesses must sign up 24 hours in advance in the Office of Stu- 
dent Activities in Ann Carter Lee Hall and pick up the ticket for 
which there is no charge. 

STUDENT-FACULTY DISPUTES 

An Academic Review Board composed of elected students, 
faculty members and the dean of the College exists to hear com- 
plaints between a student and a faculty member which have not 
been resolved at a lower level. The board will consider com- 
plaints brought by a student such as classroom attendance and 
performance, grading practices, unreasonable tests, papers and 
assignments, inaccessibility for assistance outside the class and 
unwillingness to listen or insensitivity to reasonable suggestions 
and problems. Details of the procedure and the responsibility of 
the board may be obtained from student departmental represen- 
tatives or from the dean of the College. 



Student Rules/69 



VISITATION 

Visitation is a privilege extended to the student body. This 
privilege has been granted with the understanding that residents 
of the various halls will assume the responsibility of manning the 
hall desk when paid desk aides are not on duty, and of adhering 
to the regulations to implement visitation. 

The term visitation refers to the College policy which permits a 
member of the opposite sex to visit, upon invitation, a student in 
his or her residence hall room. 

The visitation hours are listed in the chart below: 



Freshman 

Halls* 

(Custis, Madison 

Mason, Randolph) 



Trench Hill 
Russell 



Upperclass 
Halls 



Monday 


no visitation 


no visitation 


1 1 a.m. -midnight 


Tuesday 


no visitation 


no visitation 


1 1 a.m. -midnight 


Wednesday 


no visitation 


1 1 a.m. -midnight 


1 1 a.m. -midnight 


Thursday 


no visitation 


no visitation 


1 1 a.m. -midnight 


Friday 


1 1 a.m. -2 a.m. 


1 1 a.m. -2 a.m. 


1 1 a.m. -2 a.m. 


Saturday 


10 a.m. -2 a.m. 


10 a.m. -2 a.m. 


10 a.m. -2 a.m. 



Sunday 



10 a.m. -midnight 10 a.m. -midnight 10 a.m. -midnight 



* Visitation is also permitted in freshman halls on the last day 
of classes before exams. 

Guests must be signed out at least five minutes before the 
closing hour of each residence hall. 

Visitation is not permitted before registration, during reading 
days, examinations or during the period from the end of ex- 
aminations through Commencement. Should an upperclass 
residence hall wish to include visitation during the dates 
designated as the examination period, a written affirmative peti- 
tion signed by 80 percent of the residents must be presented to 
the Dean of Students at least two work days before the first ex- 
amination. 

Each resident in a hall is required to serve as a "non-paid desk 
aide" during the hours when paid desk aides are not on duty. 
This insures desk coverage so that visitation procedures can 
function. 

Any resident refusing to cover the desk may have all desk 
privileges suspended for a period of time specified by the House 
Council in consultation with the Judicial Chairman of the Stu- 
dent Association. If the desk is not adequately covered, the 
Judicial Chairman of the Student Association with the Dean of 
Students reserves the right to suspend visitation privileges in the 
residence hall. 



70/Student Rules 



Visitation Regulations 

1 . A member of the opposite sex is allowed in a student's room 
only during the specified visitation hours. 

2. The student is responsible for properly signing in and out all 
guests. (See section on Guests for details). 

3. A guest of the opposite sex must enter through the main en- 
trance of a residence hall and must be signed in before pro- 
ceeding beyond this area. 

4. A guest must depart immediately after being signed out. 

5. There may be no more than than three members of the oppo- 
site sex signed in as guests of one student at any given time. 
This does not apply to members of the IMMEDIATE family. 

6. A student is, at all times, reponsible for the conduct and ac- 
tions of his or her guests and is liable for any damage caused 
by a guest. 

7. The residence hall director or person in charge may permit 
visitation in a student's room during moving in or out of a 
room. 

8. Unaccompanied persons of the opposite sex from that of the 
hall or floor (in the case of coeducational halls) found in areas 
other than a public parlor, restroom, or hall office will be de- 
tained, questioned and subject to arrest for tresspassing. 

Men and women living in a coeducational residence hall who 
wish to visit members of the opposite sex in the same hall during 
visitation hours must be signed in and out in the guest book at 
the main desk. Permission must be obtained from the residence 
director at any other time a student needs to go to the room of 
another student of the opposite sex living in the same residence 
hall. 



Student 
A f fairs 



The Student Association 

The Student Association at Mary Washington is an important 
part of student life. Upon matriculation into the College, a stu- 
dent automatically becomes a member of the association. All 
students are encouraged to become active members, so that the 
association is a truly representative body of student thought and 
opinion, voicing the needs and concerns of the student body. 

SA PURPOSE 

The purpose of the Student Association is to work for a better 
College community through the development and strengthening 
of individual responsibility, citizenship and honor; to share with 
the faculty and the administration the obligation of respecting 
and promoting the traditions, standards and objectives of the 
College; and to instill the convictions of self government and 
democracy in every student. 

The Student Association officers acknowledge to the 
students of Mary Washington College the following obligations: 
to represent student opinion actively; to respect the rights of the 
individual; to cultivate and uphold the academic and social at- 
mosphere conducive to the fulfillment of the aims of the College; 
to promote communication, cooperation and understanding 
among students, faculty and administration; to stimulate 
awareness of national and international affairs and their impor- 
tance to the individual; to promote environmental improvements 
necessary for the welfare of the students; and to affirm that the 
Student Association shall continue as a democratic body. 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION ORGANIZATION 
I. EXECUTIVE 

The executive branch of the Student Association is the 
Executive Cabinet, a body comprised of the five SA of- 
ficers, which acts under the direction of the president of 




72/Student Affairs 



the Student Association. The president is the official 
spokesman of the Executive Cabinet of the Student 
Association. 

Executive Cabinet 

The Executive Cabinet represents the student body on 
all matters of joint concern between the administration of 
the College and the student body. The Executive Cabinet 
is the highest SA body on campus, and its members are 
the chairmen of the executive, legislative and judicial 
branches of the Student Association. 

II. LEGISLATIVE 

The legislative branch of the Student Association is the 
Senate. Each residence hall has at least one senator. 
Those halls containing more than 50 students shall be 
represented by one senator for each 50 students and one 
additional senator when an increment of 50 is exceeded 
by 30. The day students are represented by one senator 
for every 50 degree— seeking day students. 

While a senator's primary responsibility is in represen- 
ting his or her constituency, he or she also participates ac- 
tively in one or more of the senate committees to improve 
college life. 

The vice president of the Student Association presides 
over the Senate. 

The Senate is organized into standing and temporary 
committees for the efficient performance of its duties. All 
legislative powers are vested in the Senate. A proposal 
which passes the Senate shall be presented to the Ex- 
ecutive Cabinet before it is referred to the appropriate 
body. The proposal may be approved by the Executive 
Cabinet or, if vetoed by the Executive Cabinet, shall be 
returned to the Senate for debate. A two-thirds vote of 
the entire Senate shall override the veto. 

Standing Committees of the Senate 

The chairmen of the standing committees of the Senate 
are appointed by the president of the Senate. 

Interested students who are not senators are encourag- 
ed to volunteer for service on the committees. 

Secretary-Treasurer oversees the money allocated to 
the Senate. Each Senate committee submits a budget to 
the secretary-treasurer who shall make proper allotments 



Student Affairs/73 



from the Senate funds. The secretary-treasurer shall 
oversee the administration of Senate funds. 

Coordinating Committee gathers and organizes data 
concerning the state of student opinion on current issues. 
This will take the form of written surveys with the excep- 
tion of an annual financial referendum conducted for the 
S.A. Finance Committee. 

Publicity Committee provides campus publicity for any 
event or activity of the Association. 

Rules and Procedures Committee handles all campus- 
wide elections, as well as smaller group elections. It also 
reviews, revises and edits all rules concerning the Student 
Association as stated in the Constitution and the Student 
Handbook. The rules and procedures chairman, and the 
whole Senate, and the day student president should at- 
tend the first Residential Council meeting in order to ex- 
plain the procedures by which the districts are divided and 
Senate elections are held. 

Special Projects Committee brings events of varying in- 
terests to the campus. This committee organizes special 
service events, such as voter registration, speakers and 
informative panel discussions on topics of student in- 
terest. It organizes special campus events and studies the 
possibility of improvements where deemed necessary. 
The responsibility for informing the student body of 
events of the nation, state and community rests with this 
committee. 

Student Organization and Procedures Committee is 
responsible for the recommendations to the Executive 
Cabinet of student members to all Student-Faculty Com- 
mittees. This committee also forms subcommittees as 
necessary to study any student government changes in 
structure or procedure. This committee is also responsi- 
ble for the upkeep of all campus bulletin boards. 

Student Welfare Committee studies and reports its fin- 
dings on any aspect of student concern, i.e., the infir- 
mary, dining hall, police force. The committee also 
studies the possibilities of any project that would be of 
benefit to the entire student body. 

III. JUDICIAL 

All judicial powers granted in the S.A. Constitution shall 
be vested in the residence hall and day student judicial 
chairmen, the Campus Judicial Court, the Judicial Ap- 



7 4/Student Affairs 



pellate Board, the Joint Council, and the Campus Judicial 
Chairmen. 

A. The Residence Hall Judicial Chairman 

The residence hall judicial chairman shall administer 
punishments for hall infractions and certain other 
minor infractions; he or she will act as the mediary 
between the accused and the Campus Judicial Court 
and Judicial Chairman; and he or she will accompany 
the accused to a Joint Council trial if an appeal is 
made. 

Each residence hall and day student judicial chair- 
man shall be appointed in the second semester of the 
academic year for a term of two semesters. Each 
residence hall judicial chairman shall reside on cam- 
pus throughout his or her term of office. 

B. Procedure for Investigation of Social Infractions: 

1 . Upon notification of a social infraction (by a resi- 
dence hall president, administrative aide, residence 
director) the residence hall chairman shall immediate- 
ly contact witnesses and / or others involved. If there 
are conflicting accounts of the incident, written 
statements must be obtained. 

2. If there is sufficient evidence, and if the campus 
judicial chairman advises, the residence hall chairman 
must confront the suspected offender, relate the cir- 
cumstances as he or she understands them and in- 
form the student of his or her rights. 

a. The suspected offender does not have to say 
anything. 

b. The suspected offender is on his or her honor 
while discussing the circumstances of the case. If 
the residence hall chairman feels that upon 
preliminary investigation a trial is warranted, he or 
she immediately contacts the campus judicial 
chairman. Upon confirmation, from the campus 
judicial chairman, he or she then immediately in- 
forms the accused that a trial will be held. 

c. The suspected offender may have an open or clos- 
ed trial. At an open trial, only as many people as 
can safely fit into the area in which the hearing is 
to be held may attend. 

d. The suspected offender may have character 
witnesses. 



Student Affairs/75 



e. In all judicial matters under consideration by stu- 
dent courts, students shall have the right to due 
process. 

3. Accusations must be made within four school days 
after the incident. 

4. The campus judicial chairman informs the suspected 
offender of when the trial will be held. 

C. The Campus Judicial Court 

The Campus Judicial Court shall be composed of the 
campus judicial chairman and eight elected members, 
two from each class— freshman, sophomore, junior and 
senior. The court shall hear those cases referred to it by 
the residence hall judicial chairman. 

If a judicial representative feels that he or she cannot 
hear the case objectively, the representative shall dis- 
qualify himself or herself from the trial. A quorum of five 
must be present to hold a trial. 

Procedure for Campus Judicial Court Hearings: 

1 . The residence hall judicial chairman and the sus- 
pected offender are introduced to the court by the 
campus judicial chairman. 

2. The residence hall judicial chairman briefly relates to 
the judicial court the circumstances of the case and/ 
or other facts relevant to the case. 

3. The court may ask questions after each testimony. 

4. The chairman reminds the suspected offender that 
he or she is on his or her honor to tell the truth, that 
he or she does not have to testify and that character 
witnesses may testify if so desired. 

5. The chairman asks the suspected offender to relate 
the circumstances surrounding the case to the 
court. After this, the residence hall judicial chairman 
may question the offender. 

6. Any other witnesses are then escorted into the 
courtroom. 

7. All witnesses are reminded that they are on their 
honor when giving testimony. 

8. The suspected offender has the opportunity to 
cross-examine and raise any questions he or she 
may have. 

9. After testimony the chairman adjourns the court for 
deliberation. The court may recall the accused, the 



7 6/Student Affairs 



accuser and any witnesses to question further their 
testimony. At this time additional comments may be 
made. The court must reach a unanimous decision 
after discussion. 

All records of a trial (tape and minutes) in which a 
verdict of guilty is given, will be kept locked in the 
judicial files. It shall be the duty of the campus 
judicial chairman to see that these records are pro- 
perly and safely stored. Inspection of these records 
will only be granted to any person who may prove 
his or her legitimate interest in that case to the 
judicial court. 

In the case of a not-guilty verdict, all minutes and 
tapes of the trial shall be destroyed. 

10. The court is reconvened and the chairman an- 
nounces the Campus Judicial Court's decision. 

1 1 . The campus judicial chairman must remind the of- 
fender of the right to appeal the decision to the 
Judicial Appellate Board. 

1 2. All hearings will be assumed closed unless the ac- 
cused requests otherwise. 

Procedure for Appeal to Judicial Appellate Board: 

The Judicial Appellate Board shall be composed of the 
campus judicial chairman, the senior faculty member of 
the Joint Council, and the class president, or in the event 
of a conflict of interest, the vice president of the class of 
which the accused is a member. All will serve with equal 
voice and vote. 

An accused who has been found guilty of a judicial 
regulation by the Campus Judicial Court may, within five 
school days after notification of the decision of the Cam- 
pus Judicial Court, request the Judicial Appellate Board 
to review the decision of Campus Judicial Court on any 
one or combination of the following grounds: 

a. that the evidence is not sufficient to support the find- 
ing of guilt. 

b. that the Campus Judicial Court denied the accused 
procedural due process. 

c. that the penalty was too harsh for the offense com- 
mitted. 

In a request, the student shall set forth all his or her ob- 
jections to the action of the Campus Judicial Court. The 
Judicial Appellate Board will meet after receiving the let- 



Student Affairs/77 



ter of appeal to reconsider the case in its entirety. The ac- 
cused is entitled to all rights and considerations such as 
the right to counsel, character witnesses and an open 
trial if so desired. 

Procedure for Appellate Hearing: 

1 . The campus judicial chairman reads the letter of ap- 
peal to the Appellate Board and adds any relevant in- 
formation. 

2. Should the campus judicial chairman be involved in 
the hearing the senior representative will act as tem- 
porary chairman for the hearing. 

3. Testimony is heard in its entirety. 

4. The decision of the Appellate Board is never more 
harsh than the decision of Campus Judicial Court. 

5. The decision of the Judicial Appellate Board shall 
stand and be final. 

6. The judicial chairman of the residence hall shall be 
notified of the decision. 

D. The Joint Council 

The Joint Council, the highest judicial body on cam- 
pus, is composed of three faculty members and four 
students. The faculty members are appointed by the 
president of the College with the faculty member having 
the longest service on the council serving as the faculty 
chairman. The four students are members of the Cam- 
pus Judicial Court; one representative from each class. 
The campus judicial chairman, a non-voting member, 
convenes the Joint Council when an offence has been 
brought to his or her attention. 

The Joint Council hears and decides cases which 
might result in suspension or expulsion, or cases of ex- 
treme complexity. Generally, any violation of major Stu- 
dent Association regulations will appear before the Joint 
Council. A decision of the Joint Council shall be submit- 
ted to the president of the College in the form of a recom- 
mendation. 

1 . Joint Council cases are referred to the campus 
judical chairman by the following people: 

a. any member of the College community aware 
that a serious violation has been committed; and 

b. the residence hall judicial chairman. 

2. Except in the case of extenuating circumstances, an 



7 8/Student Affairs 



accusation must be made within 96 hours (four 
days) of the offense. 

3. After conferring with all persons involved, the cam- 
pus judicial chairman decides if the circumstances 
warrant a Joint Council hearing. 

4. The campus judicial chairman talks to the accused, 
the accuser and the president of the residence hall in 
which the accused resides and informs them of the 
procedures of the hearing. 

5. The campus judicial chairman contacts the President 
of the College, the Dean of Students, the faculty 
chairman, and the Student Association president to 
inform them of a case. A time for the hearing is then 
set within seven days of the accusation, except in 
the case of extenuating circumstances which would 
be determined by the campus judicial chairman. 

6. The campus judicial chairman then contacts all 
members of the Joint Council and arranges to have 
excused absences for all students involved in the 
case. 

7. The campus judicial chairman notifies the accused 
verbally and in writing of the offense of which the 
student is accused, and the time, the date and the 
place of the Joint Council hearing. The accused is in- 
formed of the right to have an open hearing, 
character witnesses and defense counsel. Defense 
counsel may be non-paid, or paid at the expense of 
the accused. All counsel is in an advisory capacity 
and the accused must speak for himself or herself if 
called upon. All hearings will be assumed to be 
closed unless the accused requests otherwise. 

Hearing: 

1 . The Joint Council members are informed of the cir- 
cumstances of the case by the campus judicial 
chairman. 

2. The accused is escorted into the council room and 
introduced to the council by the campus judicial 
chairman. 

3. The campus judicial chairman informs the accused 
again of the charge made, the defendant is inform- 
ed that the honor system applies when testifying 
and that character witnesses may testify if it is 
desired. 

4. The accused is asked to tell the circumstances sur- 



Student Affairs/79 



rounding the case and any information relevant to 
the case. 

5. The accused is then questioned by the Joint Coun- 
cil. After testimony and questioning, the accused 
remains in the council room to hear all further 
testimony. 

6. The residence hall president or judicial chairman is 
escorted into the council room and introduced to 
the Joint Council by the campus judicial chairman. 
He or she is then told to relate the circumstances of 
the case as he or she knows them. The council then 
questions the president or judicial chairman con- 
cerning the case. 

7. Testimonies are then heard from any other 
witnesses involved in the case. All persons involv- 
ed with the case are subject to the above pro- 
cedures. 

8. All statements as well as all testimonies are con- 
sidered in reaching a decision. All Joint Council 
members including the campus judicial chairman 
adjourn for deliberation. For additional questioning, 
members will return to the hearing room. 

9. A vote is taken for the decision (a majority vote is 
required for any action, but a unanimous vote is 
preferred to show the council's support for the 
decision). 

10. After a decision has been reached, the faculty 
chairman informs the President of the College (or a 
deputy appointed by the president in his absence) 
of the decision by phone. 

1 1 . The council then returns to the hearing room and 
the campus judicial chairman announces the deci- 
sion. 

12. If the case results in either the suspension or expul- 
sion of the accused, the campus judicial chairman 
immediately escorts the student to the Office of the 
Dean of Students. A student expelled by Joint 
Council can remain on campus not more than 36 
hours. The Dean of Students places a call to the 
parents of the student. The call is made in the 
presence of the student and the campus judicial 
chairman. 

1 3. After the hearing, a letter is written to the President 
of the College confirming the information conveyed 



80/Student Affairs 



to him earlier by the telephone call. A second copy 
is filed in the Joint Council file. (Student Associa- 
tion letterhead for all correspondence.) 
1 4. A letter to the student is written immediately by the 
secretary of the Joint Council who is appointed by 
the campus judicial chairman. Copies of this letter 
are sent to: 

a. student's parents; 

b. the Dean of Students; 

c. the Joint Council file; and 

d. the Office of Student Records. 

The Joint Council file shall contain a copy of the 
letter to the student and a brief summary of the 
case. 



Procedure for Appeal of Joint Council Decisions: 

1 . An accused who has been found guilty of a judicial 
regulation by the Joint Council may, within 5 
school days after the notification of the decision of 
the Joint Council, request in writing that the Presi- 
dent of the College review the decision of the Joint 
Council. A copy of this request should be sent to 
the campus judicial chairman. 

2. In the request, the student shall set forth the 
grounds for appealing the action of the Joint Coun- 
cil. An appeal may only be made on any one or com- 
bination of the following grounds: 

a. that the evidence is insufficient to support the 
finding of guilt. 

b. that the Campus Judicial Court denied the ac- 
cused procedural due process. 

c. that the penalty was too harsh for the offense 
committed. 

3. Immediately upon receipt of an appeal request, the 
President of the College shall notify the campus 
judicial chairman, who shall, as soon as possible 
thereafter, supply the President of the College with 
the transcript of the Joint Council hearing. 

4. The President of the College shall limit his review 
solely to the transcript of the Joint Council hearing 
and shall notify the accused of the results of his 
review within five days after receiving the 
transcript of the Joint Council hearing. 



Student Affairs/81 



5. If after his review the President agrees with the 
decision of the Joint Council, such decision shall 
stand and be final. If the President believes that the 
contentions of the student have merit, he will ad- 
vise the Joint Council of his views, with a request 
that the Joint Council reconsider the decision. 

6. It shall be the prerogative of the Joint Council to 
determine whether or not to reconsider a decision. 
The action of the Joint Council will be final. 

Procedure for Open Hearings: 

Procedure for an open hearing before either the Joint 
Council or the Campus Judicial Court will remain essen- 
tially the same as for a closed hearing. Any individuals 
whom the accused wishes to be present shall be allowed 
to attend, provided they can sit safely in the area. A list 
of these individuals must be submitted to the campus 
judicial chairman at least one day before the scheduled 
trial, maximum capacity to be determined by the campus 
judicial chairman. The campus judicial chairman main- 
tains the right to clear the room, and is responsible for 
maintaining the order and dignity of the court. The 
members of the court will adjourn for private delibera- 
tions after all testimony has been heard. 

CONSTITUTION 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

Preamble 

WE, THE STUDENTS OF MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE HAV- 
ING ESTABLISHED A STUDENT ASSOCIATION TO PROMOTE 
COMMUNICATION, COOPERATION AND UNDERSTANDING 
AMONG STUDENTS, FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATORS DO 
ORDAIN AND ESTABLISH THIS OUR CONSTITUTION. 

Article I: Purpose 

The purpose of the Student Association shall be to work for a 
better College community through the development and 
strengthening of individual responsibility and citizenship. The 
Student Association shall share with the faculty and the ad- 
ministration the obligation of respecting and promoting the 
tradition, standards and objectives of the College; and instilling 
the principles of self-government and democracy in every stu- 
dent. 



82/Student Affairs 



Article II: Membership 

Upon matriculation into the College a student automatically 
becomes a member of the Student Association. 

Article III: Organization 

The student body shall elect the following officers: President, 
Vice President, Judicial Chairman, Academic Affairs Chairman, 
and Student Association Whip. These five officers shall have the 
responsibility for the efficient operation of the association under 
the direction of the President of the Student Association. 

Article IV: Authority 

The authority of the Student Association is derived from delega- 
tion by the President of the College and from the student body of 
the College. The elected representatives of the Student Associa- 
tion shall have the sole authority to act in the name of the stu- 
dent body. The Student Association commits itself to uphold 
and enforce those regulations which have been made through 
mutual agreement and understanding between the Student 
Association and the administration of the College. 

Section 1. The Executive Cabinet, as representatives of the Stu- 
dent Association, shall have the responsibility to study any mat- 
ter affecting the welfare of the student body and the College. 
These representatives have the responsibility to make recom- 
mendations which will foster the best interests of the student 
body and the College. 

Section 2. The allocation of funds from student fees for 
designated purposes shall be authorized by a special committee 
or committees of the association, in keeping with the authority 
delegated by the president of the College. 
Section 3. The representatives of the Student Association shall 
have the authority to regulate all Student Association elections. 

Article V: Ratification 

Ratification of the constitution of the association shall be decid- 
ed upon by a majority of votes cast by members of the associa- 
tion. 

Article VI: Executive Department 

Section 1 . The executive power shall be vested in a deliberative 
body, the Executive Cabinet of the Student Association, under 
the direction of the president of the Student Association. 
Section 2. The Executive Cabinet shall be composed of five 



Student Affairs/83 



voting members: the President, the Vice President (the President 
of the Senate), the Judicial Chairman, the Academic Affairs 
Chairman and the Student Association Whip each with equal 
voice and vote. These officers have a term of office of one year, 
beginning during the second semester of each academic year. 
Section 3. The President, Vice President, Judicial Chairman, 
Academic Affairs Chairman and Student Association Whip shall 
be elected by the student body by a secret ballot on the basis of a 
majority of votes cast. 

Section 4 The Executive Cabinet of the Student Association 
shall have the authority to regulate all activities undertaken by 
the association; it shall also serve as an advisory body to the 
president of the College. 

Section 5. The Executive Cabinet, in consultation with the Inter- 
Club Association, shall have the authority to recognize student 
organizations. Recognition from the Cabinet is necessary prior 
to the allocation of financial assistance. 

Section 6. The specific areas of responsibility of each of the Ex- 
ecutive Cabinet officers shall be as follows: 
The President shall: 

a. call and preside over all meetings of the Executive Cabinet; 

b. be the official spokesman of the Student Association; 

c. call and preside over all meetings of the student body; 

d. nominate students to serve on faculty / student committees 
upon receipt of the Student Organization and Procedure 
Committee's recommendation; 

e. appoint chairmen to the Standing Committees of the Student 
Association, with the consent of the Executive Cabinet; 

f . designate students to represent the Student Association at 
official College functions; 

g. be responsible for the day-to-day operations of the organiza- 
tion; and 

h. serve as an ex-officio member of the Student Association 
Finance Committee. {Ex-officio shall be defined as having a 
full voice and vote.) 

The Vice Presiden f shall: 

a. be the President of the Senate and its chief presiding officer; 

b. serve as an ex-officio member of the Student Association 
Finance Committee; and 

c. serve as a member to the Board of Publications and Broad- 
casting. 

The Judicial Chairman shall: 

a. be the official representative of the Student Association in all 
matters of judicial concern; 



84/Student Affairs 






b. serve as chairman of the Campus Judicial Court with the 
responsibility of presiding over all judicial trials in a non- 
voting capacity; 

c. serve as the presiding officer of the Judicial Appellate Board 
with full voice and vote; 

d. serve as the presiding officer of the Joint Council in a non- 
voting capacity; 

e. appoint all residence hall and day student judicial chairmen; 

f . train and be responsible for all judicial chairmen; 

g. be responsible for maintaining records of all judicial pro- 
ceedings, and reporting the outcome of all Joint Council trials 
to the President of the College; and 

h. periodically hear appeals of violations of College motor vehi- 
cle regulations in consultation with the special counsel for 
the College. 

The Acadmic Affairs Chairman shall: 

a. be the coordinator of student academic concerns; 

b. have the responsibility to preside over meetings of the stu- 
dent departmental representatives, and students on faculty/ 
student committees. The proceedings of these meetings 
shall be reported to the cabinet which shall present final 
recommendations to all groups; 

c. preside over the election of four students to represent stu- 
dent concerns at faculty meetings; and 

d. attend all faculty meetings, and represent the student body 
in a non-voting capacity. 

The Student Association Whip shall: 

a. be the representative of special concerns and interests of the 
student body to the Executive Cabinet; 

b. represent the association as a member of the Student 
Association Entertainment Committee; and 

c. be chairman of the campus student lobbying group and the 
contact for all correspondence and dealings with other stu- 
dent lobbying groups. 

Section 7. The Executive Cabinet shall formulate and declare the 
Student Association goals and policies for its administration. 
The cabinet shall approve or veto any legislation enacted by the 
Senate within two weeks of its enactment. 
Section 8. The Residential Council and the Day Student Associa- 
tion shall come under the jurisdiction of the Executive Cabinet. 
The Executive Cabinet may be assisted, in a non-voting capaci- 
ty, by advisors who will include the president of the Residential 
Council, and the president of the Day Student Association, and 



Student Affairs/85 



may include as well, any other advisors that the president of the 
Student Association deems necessary. These advisors shall at- 
tend Executive Cabinet meetings on a regular basis. 
Section 9. In case of the removal of the president of the Student 
Association from office or of his or her resignation or inability to 
discharge his or her duties, the powers and duties of the office 
shall devolve to the vice president of the Student Association. In 
case of removal of the vice president, judicial chairman, 
academic affairs chairman or student association whip or upon 
resignation or inability to discharge the powers and duties of the 
aforementioned offices, a special campus-wide election shall be 
called by the president for the purpose of electing successors. 

Article VII: Legislative Department 

Section 1 . All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested 
in one legislative body, a student Senate. 
Section 2. The Senate shall have the responsibility to legislate 
with regard to all issues of student concern. The Senate may on- 
ly by the vote of at least two-thirds of its membership override a 
veto of Executive Cabinet. 

Section 3. The vice president of the Student Association shall be 
president of the Senate and the official spokesman of the Senate 
within the Executive Cabinet. The president of the Senate shall 
call and preside over all meetings of the Senate and shall have no 
vote except to decide a tie vote. 

Section 4. A student shall be eligible to be a senator with the 
stipulation that he or she attend the mandatory Senate 
workshop. Senate elections shall be held at the beginning of the 
academic year. Each senator shall be elected for a term of one 
academic year. 

Section 5, Each residence hall shall have at least one senator 
notwithstanding the number of residents in said residence hall. 
Each residence hail containing more than 50 students shall be 
represented by one senator from each district of 50 students 
and one additional senator when an increment of 50 is exceeded 
by 30 students. There shall be one senator for every 50 day 
students (excluding non-degree seeking students) and one addi- 
tional senator when an increment of 50 is exceeded by 30 
students. Senators shall be elected by and responsible to, 
predetermined districts as outlined by the Rules and Procedures 
Committee Chairman of the Senate with the assistance of the 
Vice Presidents of the Residential Council and the Day Student 
Association prior to nominations of the senators. 



86/Student Affairs 



Section 6. All powers of investigation and formal proposal shall 

be vested in the standing and temporary committees of the 

Senate for the efficient performance of its duties. The president 

of the Senate shall appoint the chairman of each committee in 

the second semester of the academic year, with the advice and 

consent of the Senate. 

Section 7. The Senate may from time to time adopt by-laws 

governing the day to day operation of the Student Association 

which by-laws shall not, however, be contrary to the provisions 

of this constitution. 

Section 8. It shall require a majority of the membership of the 

Senate to approve any legislation before the Senate. 

Section 9. Any legislation approved by the Senate shall be 

presented to the Executive Cabinet by the president of the 

Senate for approval or veto. 

Article VIM: Judicial Department 

Section 1. All judicial powers herein granted shall be vested in 
the residence hall and day student judicial chairmen, the Cam- 
pus Judicial Court, the Judicial Appellate Board, the Joint Coun- 
cil and the campus judicial chairman. 

Section 2. In all judicial matters under consideration by student 
courts students shall have the right to due process. 
Section 3. An open hearing shall be held at the request of the ac- 
cused. As many people as can safely sit in the area in which the 
hearing is to be held may attend the hearing at the request of the 
accused. 

Section 4. Each residence hall and day student judicial chairman, 
shall be appointed in the second semester of the academic year 
for a term of two semesters. Each residence hall judicial chair- 
man shall reside on campus throughout his or her term of office. 
Section 5. The campus judicial chairman shall preside over the 
Campus Judicial Court which shall be composed of eight 
representatives two from each of the four classes. The represen- 
tatives of the sophomore, junior and senior classes shall be 
elected in the second semester of the academic year. The 
representatives of the freshman class shall be elected in the first 
semester of the academic year. 

Section 6. Members of the Campus Judicial Court shall serve un- 
til the next installation of officers in the second semester of the 
academic year. Members of the Campus Judicial Court shall 
serve on the Joint Council when needed. 
Section 7. As a matter of right any student brought before the 
Campus Judicial Court may appeal a decision of the body to the 



Student Affairs/8 7 



Judicial Appellate Board which will conduct a plenary hearing on 
all such student appeals. 

Section 8. The Judicial Appellate Board shall be composed of 
the campus judicial chairman, the faculty chairman for judicial 
proceedings and the president of the class to which the accused 
belongs, all with equal voice and vote. 

Section 9. The Joint Council shall hear and decide cases which 
may result in suspension or expulsion and cases of extreme com- 
plexity. 

Section 10. The Joint Council shall be composed of four 
members of the Campus Judicial Court (one from each class) 
and three faculty members, appointed by the President of the 
College. The campus juducial chairman shall serve as the 
presiding non-voting officer of the Joint Council. 
Section 1 1 '. All verdicts and decisions of the Joint Council shall 
be communicated to the President of the College forthwith. In 
the event that the President concurs in the finding of the Joint 
Council the President shall implement same. In the event the 
President does not concur in the finding of the Joint Council he 
shall so advise the Joint Council forthwith. 



Article IX: Recall 

Section 1. Any student official may be recalled by his or her con- 
stituency if he or she has failed to perform satisfactorily the 
duties of, or uphold the standards of the office. 
Section 2. The following recall procedure shall be utilized unless 
it is contradictory to the means of recall as set forth in the con- 
stitution of the particular group considering the question. 
Section 3. Upon petition of 20 percent of the electorate for said 
office, the question of recall shall be considered. Two-thirds of 
the electorate must vote in favor of recall in order for the motion 
to be carried and a student official to be recalled by his or her 
constituency. 



Article X: Repeal and Referendum 

Section 1. The student body has the right to call for a referen- 
dum on any issue within its jurisdiction and to repeal any piece of 
legislation which has been passed by the Senate. 
Section 2. A petition of 1 percent of the student body shall call 
for the question. 

Section 3. A majority of the electorate is required to repeal 
legislation. 



8 8/Student Affairs 



Article XI: General Provisions 

Section 1 . Eligibility for any office within the Student Associaion 
shall be dependent upon the maintenance of at least a 2.0 
cumulative grade point average, good social standing, and full- 
time student status throughout the tenure of the office. 
Section 2. The oath of office for all elected representatives of 
the Association shall be as follows: 

I do hereby solemnly promise to support and maintain 
the Constitution of the Student Association of Mary 
Washington College, and I pledge my best efforts to the 

efficient performance of the duties of 

of this Association to which I have been elected. 

Article XII: Bill of Rights 

The following rights shall be the standards by which the Student 
Association shall formulate and conduct its policies: 

Section 1 . The Executive Cabinet and the Senate of the Student 
Association shall take no administrative action or enact any 
legislation which abridges the rights of students to freedom of 
inquiry, of religion, of speech, of press, of peaceful assemblage 
or association and of petition to the association for a redress of 
grievances. The rights of students shall not be denied or abridg- 
ed on account of race, color, religion, physical disability, na- 
tional origin, political affiliation, marital status, sex or age. 
Section 2. The right of students to be secure in their persons, 
houses or living quarters, papers and effects against 
unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated by any 
student. 

Section 3. No student, in any student judicial case, shall be com- 
pelled to be a witness against himself or herself, nor shall he or 
she be deprived of liberty, social or student status without due 
process. No disciplinary sanctions shall be imposed, by the stu- 
dent judiciary, on any student without notice to the accused of 
the nature and cause of the charges, and a fair hearing which 
shall include confrontation of witnesses against him or her. The 
accused shall have the right to a speedy and public trial, to have 
ample time to obtain witnesses in his or her behalf, and to have 
the assistance of cousel for his or her defense. 
Section 4. Clubs may be established for any legal purpose con- 
sistent with the policy of the College. Any such organization 
shall not be denied membership into ICA, should it desire it, 
without justifiable reason. 
Section 5. The student media is to be free of censorship. Student 



Student Affairs/89 



media editors and managers shall nor be arbitrarily suspended by 
the Student Association because of disapproval of editorial 
policy or content registered by members of the student body, 
faculty, administration, alumni or community. This freedom en- 
tails a corollary obligation under the canons of responsible jour- 
nalism and applicable regulations of the FCC. 

Article XIII: Amendments 

An amendment to this constitution may be proposed by the Ex- 
ecutive Cabinet, or the Senate, or upon petition of 1 percent of 
the student body to the Senate. A proposed amendment shall be 
posted on the Student Association, residence hall, and Day Stu- 
dent Lounge bulletin boards and shall be published in at least one 
issue of the campus-wide news medium. No less than one week 
after publication the Senate shall then consider the proposed 
amendment in an open meeting of the Senate. An affirmative 
vote of two-thirds of the Senate shall be necessary to approve an 
amendment. The amendment shall become effective only upon 
adoption by a majority of those members voting at the next 
campus-wide election. 

THE BY-LAWS OF THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The By-Laws of the Student Association shall be as an ex- 
planation and method of implementation of the Student 
Association Constitution. 
Section 1 . Legislative Procedures 

I. The rules contained in Robert's Rules of Order Revised 
shall govern the Senate in all cases to which they are ap- 
plicable and in which they are not inconsistant with the 
Student Association Constitution. 
II. The Senate shall meet every week on a day agreed upon by 
the Senate. If a district is not represented two consecutive 
weeks or misses a total of three meetings per academic 
year, the Senator from that district will lose his or her 
membership in the Senate. The president of the Senate by 
a majority vote may change such dates, provided that the 
Senate shall meet at least once a month. 

III. No member of the student body or college staff may be ex- 
cluded from any regular meeting of the Senate. 

IV. Any member of the college community may be recognized 
to address the floor of the Senate within the restrictions of 
the Rules of Order, upon recognition by the president of 
the Senate. 

V. At the beginning of the year, the Senate shall elect a 



90/Student Affairs 



parliamentarian who shall be neither a senator nor an alter- 
nate, to advise the president of the Senate on all points of 
order. Attendance for this position will follow that of any 
senator. The Senate shall also elect from its body a vice 
president who shall act as president of the Senate in the 
event of the absence of the president of the Senate. If, for 
any reason, this vice president is unable to complete the 
term of office, another election will be held. 

VI. The alternate senator shall be the student who places se- 
cond in the Senate elections. He or she shall have the same 
rights and privileges in the Senate while serving as the 
representative of his district when the senator is unable to 
attend. Senators may delegate a voting substitute 
representative with a referendum of the district yielding 
20 percent approval. The list of the district must be sub- 
mitted to the secretary of the Senate at the beginning of 
the meeting. 

VII. A motion must be made in order to move to discussion, a 
piece of business on the floor. Debate in the Senate shall 
be limited. On any one question, each senator shall be 
allowed a total of 1 minutes on the floor, unless by con- 
sent, this period be extended. A limit of three speakers in 
succession shall be allowed to present opinions on one 
side of the question. The previous question may be called 
or debate limited by a two-thirds vote of the members pre- 
sent. During discussion, the piece of business may be 
postponed indefinitely, or tabled. 
VIII. After three rejections of a senate committee proposal by 
the Senate, the committee shall have the option to take 
the proposal to the Executive Cabinet as a group of in- 
terested students. 

IX. If consent of the Senate is requested by the president of 
the Senate, it shall be considered given unless one-third of 
the senators present object. 

X. If a senator is unable to fulfill his or her term of office, an 
election shall be held among his or her constituents to fill 
the vacancy. 
XI. The following form distributed once a year, before 
Thanksgiving, shall be used in the evaluation of senators 
by their constituents. 

This is a vote of confidence ballot which will be helpful in 
determining the success of your senator thus far this year. 
It is designed to encourage your honest opinion of his / her 
performance and to have you air general comments, 



Student Affairs/91 



grievances, etc., about activities in the Senate. It is also a 
reminder to you that good representation requires your ac- 
tive concern as well as your senator's, so please consider 
both sides in measuring his / her ability. And please make 
any suggestions which you feel would expedite better 
communication among all of us. (This will be anonymous.) 
Your district number is 

1 . Do you approve of the way your senator is handling 
his / her job? 

Yes No 



2. If no, your comments and suggestions would be ap- 
preciated. 

a. Are you totally satisfied with the way you are 
being informed about Senate meetings (bulletin 
boards, meetings, etc.) 

COMMENT 



b. Do you feel that your senator is receptive to your 
point of view? 

c. In your estimation, how effective has your 
senator been as a true liaison between the SA 
and his or her constituents? 

COMMENT 

3. How well have you performed as a constituent in 
keeping up with issues, being informed and in talking over 
with your senator any questions or objections you have 
had? 

4. OTHER? 

XII. Votes of confidence will be given out in each committee to 
evaluate the performance of the committee chairman. The 
format for these votes will be determined at a later date. 

XIII. The president of the Senate will be evaluated by the entire 
Senate body at the end of the year. This vote of confidence 
will be determined at a later date. 

XIV. In order for the Senate to measure communication with 
the Executive Cabinet, there will be two special meetings 
between the Senate and Executive Cabinet, the first at the 
end of the first semester, and the other to be held within 
the month before campus elections in the spring. 



9 2/Student Affairs 



Section 2. Executive Procedure 

I. The rules contained in Robert's Rules of Order Revised, 
shall govern the Executive Cabinet in all cases to which 
they are applicable and in which they are not inconsistent 
with the SA Constitution. 

II. The Executive Cabinet shall meet once a week on a day 
agreed upon by the cabinet. Attendance of the Executive 
Cabinet shall follow the guidelines stated in Section 1 Arti- 
cle II of these by-laws. The SA president may change the 
date of the meetings with the consent of the cabinet. 

III. The president of the SA shall appoint a secretary-treasurer 
or secretary and treasurer to serve in an advisory role to 
the cabinet. 

Section 3. Senate Committees 

I. Senate committee chairmen shall be appointed by the 
president of the Senate, with the advice and consent of 
the Senate body with a two-thirds vote. Attendance at 
Senate meetings by these chairmen is governed by Sec- 
tion 1 , Article II. Membership may consist of senators and 
non-senators. In matters of committee amendments to 
proposals, only senators shall have a vote. 

II. Each senator must belong to at least one Senate commit- 
tee. Attendance is mandatory. 

III. In general, the Senate committees shall be established for 
the purpose of: 

a. advising the president of the Senate, 

b. conducting investigations followed by the drafting, 
reviewing and formalizing of the proposals and amend- 
ments as mandated to them by the Senate, and, 

c. presenting the actions of the committees for review by 
the Senate for acceptance or rejection. Upon rejection, 
suggestions for revision may be offered to the commit- 
tee. 

Following further consideration and possible revision of 
the proposal by the committee, the revised form shall be 
presented to the Senate. 

IV. The Rules and Procedures Committee may supervise the 
elections for organizations outside its original jurisdiction 
at the request of those organizations. 

Section 4. Ad-hoc Committees 

I. Ad-hoc committees shall be defined as impermanent 
groups which are not established standing Senate com- 



Student Affairs/93 



mittees. 
II. The Senate shall not abridge the right of the students to 

form ad-hoc committees. 
III. The Senate may place regulatory conditions only on the 

expenditures of funds granted to ad-hoc committees by 

the Senate. 

CAMPAIGN RULES 

1 . All candidates must be in good academic standing (2.0), 
in good social standing. 

2. Nomination by petition may be accomplished if a student 
submits a petition in support of his or her nomination, 
which has been signed by 1 per cent of the student body 
to the Senate Rules and Procedures Chairman before the 
scheduled deadline. 

3. A limit of $35 is hereby established on campaign expen- 
ditures. This amount includes any donations made to the 
campaign. Standards shall be set by the Senate Rules and 
Procedures Committee. 

4. The campus media may be used (i.e. Bullet, radio), and shall 
count as one piece of campaign material. 

5. There is a limit 25 pieces of campaign material, excluding 
qualification sheets, which may be posted on campus or in 
buildings (example a 3 x 5 index card by a phone is con- 
sidered to be a piece of campaign material). 

6. Campaigning over the public address system, in the Post 
Office or by fliers (printed material distributed to an in- 
dividual), is not permitted. 

7. All campaign material attached to fronts of buildings must 
be of oil-cloth or other suitable fabrics and must be strung 
or wired to the building. 

8. Buttons (any campaign material worn on the person) are 
unlimited in number. 

9. Each candidate must submit a typewritten qualification 
platform sheet to the Rules and Procedures Chairman. This 
is in lieu of fliers. It will be copied and distributed for posting 
in ACL foyer, Day Students Lounge and all residence halls. 
The cost of the service, which is subject to change, will be 
announced before the election. 

10. Loitering or campaigning on the day of final voting is not 
allowed in the area or the building where voting is taking 
place. All campaign material in this area must be removed 
before voting begins. 

11. All campaign material must be taken down within five days 
after elections or candidates will be subject to a fine. 



94/Student Affairs 



12. If the above mentioned rules are not followed, the can- 
didate will be disqualified. Any deliberate attempt by the 
candidate or his or her followers to disqualify another can- 
didate will result in the disqualification of the first mention- 
ed candidate. 

1 3. Exceptions to any of the above rules for any election must 
be cleared by the Chairman of the Rules and Procedures 
Committee. 

1 4. If any election is to contested, a formal written complaint 
must be made to the chairman of the Rules and Procedures 
Committee within 24 hours after the final voting. 



St u den t A f fairs/ 9 5 



Class Council 



The Class Council is the coordinating body of all class activity. 
It is composed of the four major class officers (President, Vice 
President, Secretary/Treasurer and Publicity Chairman) of each 
of the four classes. 

CONSTITUTION 

CLASS COUNCIL 

MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

Article I: Purpose 

Class Council is the coordinating body of all class activities. It 
is a separate entity with no connection with the Student 
Association. Its function is that of a body solely concerned with 
social activities on campus, and its goal is the promotion of more 
and better social activities. It is structured so that more people 
can be involved in Class Council activities and provide an at- 
mosphere of a real community through the classes working 
closely together. 

Article II: Organization 

Section 1 . Class Council shall be composed of the four major 

class officers (President, Vice President, Secretary/Treasurer 

and Publicity Chairman). These officers represent the class at 

Class Council meetings and act as a liaison between the class 

and Class Council. These four officers are equal voting members 

of Class Council. 

Section 2. The officers of Class Council shall be as follows: 

a. The president of Class Council will be elected from the 
members of Class Council by the members themselves. He 
or she may not hold any other office in Class Council. 
Duties of the president include: serving as a liaison bet- 
ween the administration and Class Council, presiding over 
all Class Council meetings, acting as advisor to the Ex- 
ecutive Cabinet of the Student Association, serving on the 
committee for screening Junior Counselors, checking of- 
ficer candidate's grades before running for office and all of- 
ficer's grades after first semester, serving on the selection 
committee for Who's Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges, and participating in the Leader- 
ship Conference. 

b. The secretary/treasurer of Class Council shall be elected 



9 6/Student Affairs 



from the secretary/treasurers of each class by the 
members of Class Council. He or she keeps minutes of all 
meetings and handles all correspondence for Class Coun- 
cil. He or she handles all Class Council finances and serves 
as chairman of the Finance Committee, composed of the 
secretary/treasurers of each class, which shall meet at 
least once a month. 

1. The function of the Finance Committee is to review all 
requests for allocations and also to set up a budget for 
Class Council. 

2. The chairman of the Finance Committee keeps an ac- 
curate record of all financial transactions and presides 
over all Finance Committee meetings. 

c. The head publicity chairman for Class Council shall be 
elected from among the publicity chairmen of the classes 
by the members of Class Council. 

1 . The Publicity Committee shall be composed of the 
publicity chairman from each class and any interested 
students. The four publicity chairmen shall meet at the 
head publicity chairman's discretion for the purpose of 
allocating responsibilities and constructing materials. 

2. The function of the Publicity Committee is to publicize 
all events sponsored by Class Council. 

Section 3. The duties of each class officer are defined as 
follows: 

a. The president shall preside over all class meetings and act 
as head organizer for all functions of his or her class. He or 
she is a liaison between the class and Class Council. 

b. The vice president presides over class meetings in the 
absence of the president. The vice president of each class 
will act as committee chairman for various activities of the 
Council throughout the year. 

c. The secretary/treasurer shall keep minutes of all meetings 
and handle all correspondence for the class. He or she shall 
serve on the Finance Committee of Class Council and 
delegate necessary finances for the class at the Finance 
Committee's discretion. 

d. The publicity chairman shall handle all publicity for the 
class. He or she shall also serve on the Publicity Committee 
for Class Council. 

Article III: Budget 

The budgets of all four classes are consolidated. This provides 



Student Affairs/97 



one single treasury from which Class Council finances all ac- 
tivities. 

Article IV: Elections 

Section 1. Attendance at workshops shall be mandatory for all 
persons seeking office. These workshops shall be held prior to 
nominations. The duties of specific offices and the functions of 
Class Council shall be discussed at these workshops. 
Section 2. Any persons desiring to have their names placed on 
the ballot after nominations shall do so by submitting a petition 
consisting of 20 percent of their respective class to the presi- 
dent of Class Council within 24 hours of official nominations. 
The petitioners must then be given a workshop training. 
Section 3. Campaign Rules 

a. All candidates must be in good academic standing (a 2.0 
overall and a 2.20 each semester while holding the term of 
office) and in good social standing. Questionable actions 
shall be looked into by the president of Class Council. 

b. There will be no campaigning over the public address 
system. 

c. A limit of $25 is hereby established on campaign expen- 
ditures. 

d. There is a limit of 25 pieces of campaign material which 
may be posted on campus or in buildings. (Example: a 3 x 5 
card by a telephone is considered one kind of campaign 
material.) 

e. All campaign material attached to fronts of buildings must 
be of oil cloth or other suitable fabric and must be strung or 
wired to the buildings. 

f . Buttons (any campaign material worn on the person) may 
be unlimited in number. 

g. No fliers (printed material distributed to individual rooms) 
are permitted. 

h. Each candidate must submit a typewritten qualification/ 
platform sheet to the president of Class Council within 24 
hours of the official nomination. This is in lieu of fliers. This 
sheet should include NAME, OFFICE SEEKING, AGE and 
MAJOR FIELD OF STUDY. A picture may be attached. The 
sheet is limited to one side of a legal page and will be 
posted in Ann Carter Lee Hall. 

i. The qualification/platform sheets do not lower the above- 
mentioned figure of 25 pieces of campaign material. 

j. Loitering or campaigning in the building where the election 
will take place on the day of final voting will not be 



98/Student Affairs 



tolerated, 
k. No campaign material is to be posted in a designated area 

on the day of the final voting. This area is designated by 

Class Council before each election. 
I. The Post Office is off limits for campaign material, 
m. If the above-mentioned rules are not followed, the can- 
didate will be disqualified, 
n. All posters must be taken down within 24 hours of election 

results announcements, 
o. Any deliberate attempt by a candidate or his or her 

followers to disqualify another candidate will result in the 

first-mentioned candidate's disqualification, 
p. Exceptions to any of the above rules for any election must 

be cleared by the president of Class Council, 
q. If an election is to be contested, a formal written complaint 

must be made to the president of Class Council within 24 

hours after the election. 

Article V: Failure to Finish Term of Office 
Section 1 . In the event of a vacancy in any of the offices other 
than president, the present officers of the class shall appoint a 
person to fill the remainder of the term. Eligible persons shall be 
chosen from candidates who did not gain their office, or, in the 
case of no interested persons in this category, the position will 
be opened to the class. Qualification sheets will be due in to the 
president of Class Council within 48 hours of the announced 
opening. 

Section 2. Should the vacancy occur in the office of the presi- 
dent, the vice president shall become president and a new vice 
president shall be appointed by the present officers to fill the re- 
maining term, following the guidelines of Section 1 . 
Section 3. Should there be a vacancy in any of the offices of 
Class Council a replacement shall be elected by the members of 
Class Council following the guidelines of the original elections. 

Article VI: Meetings 

Section 1 . Class Council meetings are held regularly, and it is the 
prerogative of the council members to decide how often meet- 
ings are necessary. It is the duty of each officer to attend all 
meetings. 

Article VII: Sponsor 

Section 1 . One member of the faculty is to be chosen by 
members of the Class Council to act as a sponsor. The sponsor's 
duties shall be to attend all meetings and activities, review all 



Student Affairs/99 



votes of confidence, and serve on the committee for the selec- 
tion of Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges. The sponsor shall undergo a vote of confidence by 
Class Council members, to be reviewed by the president of Class 
Council. 

By-Laws 

The By-Laws of Class Council shall be an explanation and 
method of implementation of the Class Council Constitution. 
Section 1 . Oath of Office 

/ do solemnly promise to uphold the Constitu- 
tion of Class Council of Mary Washington College and pledge 

to efficiently perform the duties of the office of 

to which I have been elected. 
Section 2. A vote-of-conf idence shall be taken for the officers of 
Class Council within a month after the installation of the 
freshman class officers. If a negative vote-of-confidence is 
found, an election shall be held by members of Class Council to 
fill the vacant position. 

Section 3. It is strongly suggested that each class have an inter- 
dorm council. The purpose of an interdorm council is to involve 
as many people as possible to facilitate communication between 
officers and class, to provide a body from which the officers can 
draw people to act as chairmen and committee members for 
Class Council events and to preserve the individual class identi- 
ty. 

Section 4. Recall 

a. Any student official may be recalled by his or her consti- 
tuency if he or she has failed to perform efficiently the 
duties of, or uphold the standards of, the office. 

b. Upon petition of 20 percent of the electorate for said of- 
fice, the question of recall shall be considered. A quorum 
of the electorate must vote in favor of recall.in order for the 
motion to be carried and a student official to be recalled by 
his or her constituency. 

c. If a member receives a negative vote of confidence from 
either his or her fellow officers as a class officer or from 
Class Council as a member of Class Council, then a recall 
may be initiated by a vote of 1 2 members. A vote of con- 
fidence shall be taken once each semester. 

Section 5. An officer must remain in good standing (maintaining 
a 2.0 overall and a 2.20 while in office) and also in good social 
standing throughout his or her term in office. 



/ 00/ Student Affairs 



Section 6. A vote of confidence shall be taken on each class of- 
ficer by their respective officers. A vote of confidence shall be 
taken on each member of Class Council by the other members. If 
a negative vote is taken on anyone, action shall be taken by 
Class Council. 

Section 7. A vacancy shall exist when an officer fails to uphold 
good academic or social standing, or is recalled by his or her con- 
stituency. 

Section 8. A day student representative shall be chosen by the 
day students as an advisor to serve as a non-voting member of 
Class Council. 

Section 9. The president of the class of the accused shall serve 
on the Judicial Appellate Board. 



Student Affairs/ 10 1 



Student Membership on 
Faculty Committees and 
Departmental 
Representatives 



There are various student-faculty committees, all of which 
welcome and encourage active student participation. These 
committees deal with many areas of College concern — such as 
academic policies and procedures, administrative responsibility 
for specific aspects of the College program and specific interests 
involving students and faculty. 

Students interested in serving on these committees must first 
file applications during the second semester of the academic 
year to the Senate Student Organizations and Procedures Com- 
mittee. The SOP Committee then studies these applications and 
makes its recommendations for student representatives to the 
president of the Student Association. The president studies 
these recommendations and from these makes his or her 
nominations for student representatives to the President of the 
College who then formally invites these students to be members 
of a committee. 

The following is a list of faculty committees on which students 
serve: 

Academic Counseling and Guidance Committee— This com- 
mittee deals with matters related to academic counseling and 
guidance, such as continuous evaluation of the academic advis- 
ing programs of the College and of the several departments and 
makes periodic study of the academic probation and suspension 
policies of the College. 

Academic Public Occasions Committee— This committee 
deals with Academic Convocations and Assemblies, Visiting 
Lecturers and the Eminent Scholars Program. 

Admissions Policy Committee — This committee assists and 
advises the Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid on matters 
concerning admissions policy of the College, including changes 



1 02/ Student A f fairs 



in existing policy, early admissions, minority enrollment and the 
admission of older students and those with atypical preparation. 

Committee on College Affairs — This committee deals with 
matters recommended for study by the College President. 

Committee on Special Degree Programs— This committee ap- 
proves or disapproves applications for special degree programs 
and aids in setting up the curriculum for these programs. 

Curriculum Committee— This committee maintains a continu- 
ing study of matters related to curriculum, such as types of 
degrees and requirements for graduation, course offerings, re- 
quirements for major programs, departmental recommenda- 
tions for adding new courses and for modifying or discontinuing 
existing courses. 

Instruction and Academic Affairs Committee — This commit- 
tee studies matters related to instruction and the recognition of 
superior students, such as grading practices and classroom 
teaching procedures, schedule of individual class meetings, in- 
dividual study programs and the granting of academic recogni- 
tion for superior achievement and departmental honors pro- 
grams. 

Internship Committee— This committee oversees the Intern- 
ship Program, including the approval of new internship pro- 
posals, awarding of credit, and the continuing evaluation of all 
aspects of the program. 

Library Committee— This committee helps interpret the library 
needs of the faculty and students, recommends policy with 
respect to the purchase of books, periodicals and other library 
materials, advises the librarian on matters of genera! library 
policy and encourages and promotes the use of the library. 

Election Guidelines, Role, and Responsibilities of Departmental 

Representatives 
A. Election Procedures 

1 . Nomination and voting by declared majors to be repre- 
sented. 

2. Eligibility for election — must be a declared major who 
will have at least 58 hours toward an MWC degree by the 
opening of the next academic session. 



Studen t A f fairs/ 1 03 



3. Election results— to be reported in writing by department 
chairman to the student association academic affairs 
chairman and the Dean of the College. 

4. Elections — to be conducted by the outgoing represen- 
tatives and/or the departmental chairman. 

5. Term of office — one academic year. 

6. Time of election — second semester of academic year, by 
date set by the academic affairs chairman. 

B. Number of Representatives 

One student representative for each 20 majors or fraction 
thereof. Double departments should have representatives 
for each section of the department. 

C. Roles and Responsibilities 

1 . To attend meetings of the department faculty and have a 
voice on all matters concerning students. 

2. To attend every meeting of the Student Association 
Academic Affairs Committee and represent their depart- 
ment. 

3. To call meetings of their department majors regularly: 

a. to inform them of departmental matters. 

b. to inform them of S. A. Academic Affairs Committee 
matters. 

4. To keep minutes of department majors' meetings. 

5. To aid department chairman in maintaining a roster of 
declared majors (copy to be furnished to academic af- 
fairs chairman). 

6. To furnish the department chairman with a copy of 
minutes from meetings of the departmental majors. 

7. To act as mediary in any minor student/faculty dispute 
within the department. 

8. To disseminate to majors any information on career plan- 
ning and graduate study opportunities. 

9. To maintain a file containing guidelines, minutes of 
meetings, rolls, and a roster of majors, which shall be 
turned over to their successors. 



/ 04/ Student A f fairs 



Honor Code 



Registration as a student in the College is not complete until 
the Honor Pledge Card has been signed. No grades or credits will 
be released unless the pledge is on file. 

If a student has not signed an Honor Pledge Card by the end of 
the Drop Period (as specified on the Master Calendar), the stu- 
dent's matriculation shall be cancelled, and fees paid will be 
refunded according to the withdrawal outlined in the catalog. 

New students shall have the opportunity to receive honor 
counseling by an Honor Council Representative or an Honor 
Counselor and sign the Honor Pledge Card. Notices as to when 
counseling will be held will be posted during registration time. 

If by the third week of classes, the student still has not signed 
the Pledge Card, he or she shall receive a notice to schedule a 
counseling session with an Honor Council Representative or 
Honor Counselor. 

The ultimate responsibility for counseling and signing of the 
Honor Pledge Card rests in the hands of each individual student. 

HONOR PLEDGE 

/, as a student and citizen of Mary Washington College, do 
hereby resolve to uphold the honor of the College by refraining 
from giving or receiving academic material in a manner not 
authorized by the instructor; from the illegal appropriation of the 
property of others; and from the deliberate falsification of facts. I 
shall do all in my power at all times to create a spirit of honesty 
and honor for its own sake both by upholding the Honor System 
myself and by helping others to do so. I understand the Honor 
System and realize that a plea of ignorance will not be accepted 
by the Honor Council. 



HONOR CONSTITUTION 

Preamble: 

The Honor System is the mature and deeply cherished moral 
code of personal integrity at Mary Washington College. The 
students derive their authority and responsibility to create and 
maintain an honor system from the Board of Visitors. Because 
students are responsible for deciding when a breach of honor 
has been committed, the enforcement of the Honor System is in 
their hands. 



Studen t A f fairs/ 1 05 



Each student as a member of the student body at Mary 
Washington has the responsibility, not only for familiarizing 
himself or herself with the provisions of the Honor Code upon 
which the student body has agreed, but also for developing 
within himself or herself the highest and strongest personal 
honor code possible. Each student must realize that by accept- 
ing admission to Mary Washington, he or she has acknowledged 
his or her commitment to the provisions of the Honor Code. 
When he or she signs the Honor Pledge Card, he or she is com- 
miting himself or herself to support the Honor System. The stu- 
dent is stating that he or she understands it and realizes that a 
plea of ignorance is not acceptable. Matriculation as a student in 
the College is not complete until the Honor Pledge Card has been 
signed. No grades or credits will be released unless the pledge is 
on file. 



Article I: Scope of the Honor System 

Sect/on 1. The Honor System requires that a student govern his 
or her own conduct in an honorable way at all times in his or her 
dealings with any member of the College community. 
Section 2. The Honor System applies to a student's conduct in 
all aspects of his or her academic pursuits at Mary Washington. 

Article II: Provisions of the Honor Code 

Section 1. The violations of the Honor Code are lying, stealing or 
cheating. 

A. Lying-A deliberate, unjustifiable misrepresentation of the 
truth. 

1. Forgery is considered lying. Forgery is falsely and 
fraudulently making or altering a writing or document 
which if geniune would have some legal effect upon 
the rights of others. 

2. Falsification or misuse of the student identification 
card is considered lying. The use of another's iden- 
tification card or allowing another to use one's own 
constitutes misuse. 

B. Cheating-An intentional misrepresentation of someone 
else's work as being one's own or a misrepresentation of 
the circumstances under which the work was done. 

1 . Copying is the use of (a) one's own material (b) 
another's material (c) crib notes (d) textbook (e) class 
notes during an examination without authorization to 



/ 06/Student A f fairs 



do so. 

NOTE: Crib notes refer to notes brought into class for 

illicit use during an examination. 

2. Collaboration — Working with another person or per- 
sons in the execution of a test, report, paper, 
laboratory work or assignment unless author/zed to do 
so. Except where joint effort is permitted or special 
regulations are made by the instructor, all work for 
which credit is sought must be performed by the in- 
dividual student. 

3. Plagiarism — Consists of copying or imitating the 
language, ideas and thoughts of another author and 
presenting this material as one's original work. 

a. Common Knowledge — Consists of facts or opin- 
ions commonly known to authorities in a particular 
field of study. (Rule of thumb: Facts or opinions 
which can be found in four or more sources are 
generally considered common knowledge; opi- 
nions or general facts which are common to at least 
four sources used for a paper do not usually require 
footnotes unless directly quoted.) 

b. Paraphrasing — Consists of complete rewording, 
using one's own sentence structure. Any 
paraphrased facts or ideas that are not common 
knowledge must also be footnoted. 

c. Quoted Matter — When the writer borrows what 
belongs to another, he or she must indicate the 
source by internal reference or footnote. The writer 
must enclose another's words, phrases or ideas in 
direct quotations. All direct quotations of more 
than three consecutive significant words (this is 
only a rule of thumb) should be indicated by quota- 
tion marks. It is the student's responsibility to use a 
recognized source, such as Seeber's A Style 
Manual for Students or the MLA Style Sheet as a 
guide for making footnotes and bibliography unless 
otherwise instructed by the professor. 

IT IS THE STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY TO FIND 
OUT ALL THE REQUIREMENTS OF ANY COURSE 
FROM THE PROFESSOR. IF A STUDENT IS IN 
DOUBT CONCERNING PARAPHRASING AND 
COMMON KNOWLEDGE, HE OR SHE SHOULD 
CONSULTTHE PROFESSOR FOR INSTRUCTIONS. 

4. Divulging Information — Revealing or disclosing infor- 



Stud en t A f fairs/ 1 7 



mation relating to academic work without authoriza- 
tion to do so. 
5 . It is the obligation of the professor to explain the condi- 
tions under which the work assigned is to be com- 
pleted, and it is the obligation of the student to be 
familiar with and to accept these conditions. 

In order to reaffirm his or her belief in the Honor 
System, a student shall write out and sign his or her 
name to the following pledge on quizzes, examina- 
tions and other important written work: / hereby 
declare upon my word of honor that I have neither 
given nor received help on this work. This pledge 
means that the work which the student hands in to his 
or her professor is his or her own and has been done in 
accordance with the requirements of the course as 
presented by the professor. This pledge also means 
that the student will not divulge the contents nor the 
format of an examination until all exams have been 
taken. 

C. Stealing— Taking another person's property without his or 
her authorization or consent. Unauthorized duplication of 
a College key is considered stealing. 

Article III: Organization of the Honor Council 

Section 1 . The Honor Council is a judicial body designed to try 
specific cases brought to it by any member of the College com- 
munity regarding possible violations of the Honor Code. It has no 
responsibility for discovering guilt before an accusation has 
been made. The Honor Council shall consist of a president and 
eight class representatives, two elected from each class. 
Section 2. The Honor Council president is elected by the student 
body on the basis of a simple majority. His or her term of office 
will begin in the spring of the year in which he or she was 
elected, continuing until his or her successor is duly installed or 
until he or she is reinstalled in the event he or she is re-elected. 
The Honor Council president must not be on academic or social 
probation. He or she may be recalled if he or she fails to perform 
efficiently the duties or uphold the standards of the office. The 
duties of the Honor Council president are as follows: 

A. To counsel privately all students as the need may arise; 

B. To call and act as chairman of the Honor Council as a non- 
voting member during a trial; 

C. To call and preside over all meetings of the Honor Council 



1 08/Student Affairs 



other than trails as a voting member; 

D. To be the official spokesman for the student body on mat- 
ters concerning the Mary Washington College Honor 
System; 

E. To keep accurate records of Honor Pledge Cards; 

F. To properly counsel an accused party of his or her rights 
(see Article IV) in the event of an honor trial; 

G. TO inquire into the charge and see that all necessary 
witnesses and parties are available; 

H. If the president becomes unable to discharge any 
necessary function, when needed, he or she must resign 
and a new president will be elected. 
Section 3. An Honor Council representative cannot be on social 
or academic probation. He or she shall be installed in the spring 
of the year in which he or she is elected but will not assume his or 
her duties until the day after graduation the same year. If any 
council member should resign or be unable to discharge his or 
her duties, his or her office shall be filled by an election in his or 
her respective class. Honor Council representatives may suc- 
ceed themselves. Any Honor Council representative may be 
recalled by his or her class if he or she has failed to perform effi- 
ciently the duties or uphold the standards of the office. The 
duties of each Honor Council representative are as follows: 

A. To promote an understanding of the Mary Washington 
Honor System; 

B. To serve during the trials as a voting member; 

C. To interpret the constitution as elected representatives of 
the student body; 1 

D. To return to school at his or her own expense during the 
school year for an honor trial. If there is a need for him or 
her to return for an honor trial during the summer or school 
holidays, he or she shall be reimbursed for travel expenses 
by the Honor Council; 

E. To participate in leadership conference and all orientation 
sessions in any capacity needed; 

F. To assist with any clerical work required of the Honor 
Council. 

Section 4. One Honor Council representative will be elected vice 
president by the council. In the absence of the Honor Council 
president, he or she will assume all the duties of the president 
which may be required. Only in the case of an emergency may 
the vice president serve as the chairman of an honor trial. The 
vice president shall be responsible for accurate records of ex- 
penditures of the Honor Council budget funds. 



Studen t A f fairs/ 1 09 



Section 5. The honor contact within each residence hall and for 
the day students shall be appointed in the spring by the Honor 
Council. The honor contact shall assume his or her duties the 
following August. In freshman residence halls the honor con- 
tacts shall be appointed by the Honor Council in September. The 
responsibilities of the residence hall honor contact are: 

A. To attend training sessions given by the Honor Council; 

B. As the official representative of the Honor Council within 
the residence hall, he or she shall be responsible for relay- 
ing to the residents information referred to him or her by 
the Honor Council; 

C. To encourage hall residents to report immediately any in- 
cidents of lost or stolen objects and to accumulate and 
record all facts reported to him or her about any possible 
Honor violation occurring in the residence hall, and refer 
this information to the Honor Council president. 

The responsibilities of the day student honor contact are: 

A. To attend training sessions given by the Honor Council; 

B. As the official representative of the Honor Council among 
the day students, he or she shall be responsible for relay- 
ing to the day students information referred to him or her 
by the Honor Council. 

C. To keep a record of items lost or reported stolen and to en- 
courage day students to report any incidents of lost or 
stolen objects immediately whenever they are within the 
jurisdiction of the Honor Council. 

Sect/on 6. There will be two faculty advisers selected by the 
Honor Council, at least one of whom shall be present at each 
trial, but shall have no vote. The Honor Council may seek the ad- 
vice and assistance of legal counsel. 

Section 7. Upon a petition of 20 percent of the class (in the case 
of the honor representative) or the campus (in case of the presi- 
dent) to the Honor Council, the question of recall shall be con- 
sidered. A quorum of the Honor Council must vote in favor of 
recall in order for the motion to be carried. If the recall motion is 
carried, there will be an election as soon as possible. The Honor 
Council retains the power of veto over a petition of recall; 
however, this veto may be overridden upon a petition of 40 per- 
cent of the constituency followed by a simple majority of the 
votes cast by the student body. The recalled member of the 
Honor Council retains the right to participate in the election. 



7 / O/Student A f fairs 



Article IV: Procedures 
Section 1. Investigation 

A. The Honor Council is governed by the premise that every 
person is deemed innocent until proven guilty. A student 
who places himself or herself in suspicious circumstances 
is endangering both himself or herself and the Honor 
System. Any member of the College community at any 
time should feel obligated to investigate a possible viola- 
tion of the Honor Code, and with the assistance of such 
persons as he or she may have reason to call upon, in- 
vestigate the matter as secretly and speedily as possible. 

B. If, after the investigation, the investigating party is 
satisfied that the suspected student is not guilty of an 
Honor violation, there shall be no further proceedings, and 
nothing connected with the case will be made public. If, 
however, the investigating party believes the suspected 
person guilty of a violation of the Honor Code, he or she 
shall approach that person with a request for an explana- 
tion of his or her conduct. If the former party is satisfied by 
the latter's explanation, there shall be no further pro- 
ceedings. If no satisfactory explanation is made, the in- 
vestigating party shall specifically accuse the one under 
suspicion and shall immediately notify the Honor Council 
president. The accuser must also give written notice of ac- 
cusation to the Honor Council president. 

C. The Honor Council president shall notify the accused in 
writing of the charge against him or her and shall require 
him or her to elect whether to withdraw from school 
within 72 hours or stand trial as outlined in the Honor Con- 
stitution. 

D. If the accused does not withdraw from school within 72 
hours after notification by the Honor Council president, he 
or she shall be deemed to have elected to stand trial. The 
Honor Council president shall set a time and place for trial 
and shall notify the accused of the provisions and pro- 
cedures applicable to trial. 

E. The trial shall take place not less than three days nor more 
than 1 5 days after the formal notification by the Honor 
Council president to the accused. The accused may waive 
the three day restriction if he or she should desire an earlier 
trial. For good cause shown, the Honor Council president 
with the consent of the accused may extend the trial 
beyond the 1 5 day limit. If the accused prefers to 
withdraw from the College, his or her status shall be the 



Student Affairs/ 1 1 1 



same as though he had been found guilty and dismissed by 
the Honor Council. On his or her official trascript, it shall be 
recorded that the student withdrew from the College 
under accusation of an honor violation. An accuser may 
not drop a charge upon the agreement of the accused to 
depart from the College. When the accused desires to 
leave Mary Washington without a trial, he or she must 
notify the Honor Council president of such action. Follow- 
ing such notification, the Honor Council shall take action 
to record the facts as they were presented, and the proper 
administrative offices will be notified to record the change 
of status and the accusation on the transcript. If a student 
leaves the College either before or after a trial, the Honor 
Council president shall notify the President of the College 
of such action. 

Section 2. Trial 

A. A quorum which consists of five Honor Council represen- 
tatives and the Honor Council president is necessary 
before a trial can convene. 

B. If the council member feels that he or she cannot hear the 
case objectively or if the council feels that a member can- 
not judge without bias, then said representative shall dis- 
qualify himself or herself or be disqualified by the council 
from the trial by a two-thirds vote of the presiding 
members. 

C. The accused may engage someone to advise and act as his 
or her counsel, but the accused must answer all questions 
directed to him or her. The accused may ask anyone whom 
he or she desires to speak in his or her behalf. 

D. The accused may request an open trial. As many people as 
can safely sit in the area in which the trial is to be held may 
attend the trial upon the request of the accused. Those 
persons present during the trial are to keep facts of the 
case secret for the benefit of the parties involved directly. 
No notes may be taken during the trial by spectators and 
no information relating to the case may be given or printed 
unless requested by the accused, regardless of whether 
the verdict is not guilty or guilty. 

E. The trial shall be called to order by the Honor Council presi- 
dent. The accused and the accuser shall be present when 
all testimony is given. The accuser shall then relate to the 
council the events leading up to the actual confrontation 
of the accused party. Individually, witnesses for the ac- 
cuser are then asked to testify. The council may ask points 



1 1 2 /Student Affairs 



of clarification following this testimony. The accused is 
then asked to relate the facts of his or her involvement in 
the case. Each witness for the accussed shall be heard in- 
dividually. The council again may ask questions of the ac- 
cused and the latter's witnesses for clarification. At this 
point the accused or any other participants in the trial pro- 
ceedings (e.g. advisory counsel for the accused) may ask 
questions of the accuser or any witnesses present. Before 
the council deliberates, the president shall call for any fur- 
ther comments or questions from any person present. 
During the council's deliberation, it may recall the accus- 
ed, the accuser and any witnesses to question further their 
testimony. At this time, they may make additional com- 
ments. 

F. No person shall be found guilty unless the council is con- 
vinced of the guilt of the accused. The council shall vote 
by secret ballot. There shall be no abstaining vote. A ver- 
dict of guilty, unless unanimous, may be upon but one 
dissenting vote. If, upon due deliberation and votes taken, 
the council cannot agree unanimously or with a single 
dissenting vote, the accused shall be acquitted. 

G. Whenever a violation of the Honor Code is proved the 
Honor Council will decide upon one of the following: 

1 . No dismissal. 

2. Suspension — Dismiss the student for a semester or a 
definite length of time. After such time, he or she may 
reapply to the College through the Office of Admis- 
sions and Financial Aid. 1 

3. Absolute Dismissal — Absolute dismissal shall be im- 
posed by a vote which is unanimous or with one 
dessenting vote. The Honor Council must impose one 
of the above penalties. The Honor Council will not take 
into consideration a previous offense of the accused in 
determining guilt in a trial. However, the Honor Coun- 
cil may take into consideration a previous verdict of 
guilty in determining the penalty to be imposed in this 
trial. All guilty verdicts are recorded on the student's 
transcript. There will be public statement following 
the trial (in the case of a verdict of guilty) regarding the 
type of case and the penalty imposed. It shall be the 
practice of the Honor Council to give such publicity of 
the facts of a case resulting in guilt as shall be con- 
sidered advisable. 1 All convictions shall relate back to 
the date of the offense; no grades or credits shall be 



Studen t A f fairs/ 1 1 3 



awarded from that date forward regardless of the date 
of conviction. In the event of a No dismissal penalty, 
the conviction shall have the following effect on 
grades and credits: 

1 . In the case of lying or stealing, no loss of grades or 
credits. 

2. In the case of cheating, no grades or credits shall 
be awarded for the course in which the offense 
was committed. 

In the event of a conviction for any offense resulting 
in a penalty of Suspension or Dismissal, the period of 
suspension or dismissal shall commence upon the 
date of conviction. 
H. Minutes of the trial shall be kept by either an employed 
stenographer or tape recorder, or both. These minutes 
shall be in the custody of the Honor Council president, and 
it shall be his or her duty to see that they are properly 
stored for safekeeping. In the case of a verdict of not guil- 
ty, the minutes of the trial shall be destroyed immediately. 
In the event of a guilty verdict, the minutes shall be typed 
and kept on file by the Honor Council president. The 
transcript of the trial shall only be open to inspection by 
any person who may satisfy the Honor Council of his or 
her legitimate interest in the case. No notes or memoranda 
shall be permitted to be made from the transcript. During 
the inspection of these minutes, at least two council 
members shall be present. 
I. A case resulting in a verdict of guilty may be reopened only 
upon the offering of new evidence bearing directly upon 
the question of guilt or mistrial. Any person seeking to 
reopen a case shall appear before the Honor Council and 
state the nature of the evidence. The council shall then 
consider whether the evidence is sufficient to warrant a 
retrial. If a case is reopened, it is to be entirely retried. 
J. Whenever there is a verdict of guilty, the Honor Council 
president shall promptly notify the President of the Col- 
lege. 

Section 3. Appeal 

An accused who has been found guilty of an honor offense by 
the Honor Council may, within five days after notification of the 
decision of the Honor Council, request the President of the Col- 
lege to review the decision of the Honor Council on any one or 
combination of the following points: 



1 / 4/ Student A f fairs 



A. Whether the evidence is sufficient to support the finding 
of guilt. 

B. Whether the Honor Council denied the accused procedural 
due process. 

C. Whether the penalty was too harsh for the offense com- 
mitted. In his or her request, the student shall set forth all 
his or her objections to the action of the Honor Council. Im- 
mediately upon receipt of such a request, the President 
shall notify the president of the Honor Council who shall, 
as soon as possible thereafter, supply the President with 
the transcript of the Honor Council hearing. The President 
of the College shall limit his review solely to the transcript 
of the Honor Council hearing and shall notify the accused 
of the results of his review within five days after receiving 
the transcript of the Honor Council hearing. If after such 
review the President agrees with the decision of the Honor 
Council, such decision shall stand and be final. If the Presi- 
dent believes that the contentions of the student have 
merit, he shall remand the case with his comments to the 
Honor Council for such further proceedings as it deems 
appropriate. 

Article V: Ratification 

Section 1 . This constitution shall go into effect when approved 
by two-thirds of the Honor Council and a simple majority of 
votes cast by the student body and when approved by the Board 
of Visitors of the College. 

Article VI: Amendments 

Section 1. An amendment to this constitution may be proposed 
by the Honor Council. An affirmative vote of two-thirds of the 
Honor Council and a simple majority of the votes cast by the stu- 
dent body shall ratify an amendment. The Honor Council retains 
the power of veto over a student petitioned amendment; 
however, this veto may be overridden upon a petition of 1 per- 
cent of the student body. If passed, the amendment shall go into 
effect when approved by the Board of Visitors of the College. 



1 The Executive Committee of the Mary Washington College Board of Visitors 
approved on May 15, 1976, the following constitutional interpretations, as 
adopted by the Honor Council on April 25, 1 976, for inclusion with the Honor 
Council By-Laws: 



Student Affairs/ 1 15 



a. Article III, Section 3, Subsection G, of the Honor Constitution provides that 
it is the duty of the Honor Council to interpret the Honor Constitution. 
Interpretations 

When an accused has been found guilty of an honor offense, and has been 
punished by suspension or absolute dismissal, it is the council's interpreta- 
tion of the Honor Constitution that the period of suspension or dismissal 
shall commence forthwith. One who has been suspended or dismissed 
shall have no rights and privileges of a Mary Washington College student, 
including the right to reside on campus, attend classes, or use College 
facilities; except one who has been suspended shall be restored to all rights 
and privileges upon readmission. One who has failed to comply with a judg- 
ment of the Honor Council within 36 hours shall be deemed not to have 
complied forthwith. 

In the event a person found guilty by the Honor Council appeals the 
punishment of the council, he or she shall, nevertheless, comply fully with 
the judgment of the Honor Council until such time as it may be changed. 

b. Article IV, Section 2, Subsection G-3, provides for publicity of the results 
of procedures under the Honor Constitution. 

Interpretations 

The Honor Council president shall notify the parent, guardian or such other 
responsible person shown on the official records of the student enrolled of 
a determination of guilt of such student. 



Clubs 

and 

Organizations 



ACTIVITIES COORDINATING BOARD 

The ACB assists the Assistant Dean of Students in the plann- 
ing of the social life of the campus. Its membership consists of 
the presidents of the Student Association, Senate, ICA, Class 
Council, Residential Association and Recreation Association; 
the academic affairs chairman of the Student Association; and 
representatives from the Board of Publications and Broad- 
casting. Its task is to coordinate all of the projects undertaken by 
the groups it represents. It also prints a monthly activity calen- 
dar. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

The Board of Publications and Broadcasting 

The Board of Publications and Broadcasting serves in the role 
of publisher for all student publications and broadcasts which 
draw support from the comprehensive fee at Mary Washington 
College. In this capacity it recommends financial support from 
comprehensive funds for the maintenance of these communica- 
tions, and while it guarantees editorial freedom for the student 
publications and broadcasts to maintain their integrity of pur- 
pose as vehicles for free inquiry and free expression, it also 
ascertains that each publication is complying with its own 
general statement of policy. Grievances against any of the 
publications may be brought to the board. 

The Battlefield 

The College yearbook, The Battlefield, captures the student 
year in words and pictures. A student publication, it contains 
pictures of the administration, faculty and students, as well as of 
all the clubs and other activities which make up student life. 

The Bullet 

The Bullet, the campus newspaper, is published weekly. Pic- 
tures and articles about recent events and important upcoming 



Clubs and Organizations/ 1 1 7 



events, editorials and letters to the editor on controversial sub- 
jects of current interest to the student are featured. 

A u bade 

Aubade, published annually, is the campus literary and arts 
magazine produced to publicize the literary and artistic talents of 
students and to encourage such work. It contains short stories, 
plays, poems and graphics by Mary Washington students and 
faculty. 

WMWC 

The College Radio Station, WMWC, broadcasts to Seacobeck, 

Ann Carter Lee Hall, Chandler Hall, George Washington Hall, and 

all residence halls except Trench Hill. Programs include varied 

selections of music, campus news, sports coverage and items of 

local interest. Broadcasts from outside stations are also 

featured. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE TEAMS 

Intercollegiate competition for women is available in field 
hockey, tennis, volleyball, cross country, and golf in the fall; 
basketball and swimming in the winter; and lacrosse, tennis, 
golf, and track in the spring. Riding competition for men and 
women is available throughout the year. Intercollegiate competi- 
tion for men is available in soccer and cross country in the fall; 
basketball in the winter; and tennis, golf, and track in the spring. 

Notices concerning organizational meetings for each team will 
appear in the weekly Bulletin prior to the meeting time. Practices 
are usually scheduled after 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 
and last for two hours or less. 

Students are encouraged to participate in the intercollegiate 
program as players, swimmers, managers, scorers, timers or 
statisticians. Each position plays an integral role in the success 
of MWC's intercollegiate teams. 

State tournaments climax most of the intercollegiate teams' 
seasons. Participants are also honored at an annual sports 
award banquet. 

Students interested in trying out for varsity teams are en- 
couraged to seek out the coaches as soon as they arrive in the 
fall. 

INTER-CLUB ASSOCIATION 

The Inter-Club Association (ICA) of Mary Washington College 
is an organization composed of all recognized clubs and honor 
societies of the College. Delegates from each of these organiza- 




1 18/ Clubs and Organizations 



tions represent their respective groups at association meetings 
held regularly throughout the school year. 

The purpose of ICA is to coordinate an overall program of 
organizational activities for all members of the association; to 
act as an agency for discussion of mutual problems; to assist in 
the development of new organizations to meet student needs; to 
recognize new clubs; and to assist in the coordination of major 
campus projects like Family Weekend and Alumni Homecoming. 

The governing body of the ICA is responsible for providing an 
open house each fall to acquaint students with the activities on 
campus; reviewing the petitions for new clubs; and making ma- 
jor recommendations to the whole association. Included on the 
council are the five executive officers of the association, and a 
representative from each of the following organizational group- 
ings: Recreation, Language, Science, Social Science, 
Honoraries, Service, Fine Arts, and Religion. 

Afro-American Club 

Purpose: to stimulate an interet and understanding of the Black 
Culture. 

Requirement: any member of the College community with an in- 
terest in Black Culture. 

Alpha Psi Omega — National Honorary Dramatic Fraternity 

Purpose: to promote excellence in Theater Arts. 
Requirement: specific theatrical experience as described in the 
national constitution. 

American Chemical Society— MWC Student Affiliate Chapter 

Purpose: to provide students interested in chemistry and chemi- 
cal engineering with greater insight into these fields and to in- 
still a sense of professionalism in these future scientists. 

Requirement: enrollment in coursework leading toward a degree 
in chemistry or related desclipline. 

Art Therapy Club 

Purpose: to expand the knowledge, interest, and involvement in 
the field of art therapy for all Mary Washington College stu- 
dents and professors. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Baptist Student Union 

Purpose: to attain personal growth, as well as to minister to the 



Clubs and Organizations/1 19 



needs of fellow students. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Campus Christian Community 

Purpose: to bring about a synthesis of many diverse elements 
and interests in Christian fellowship, to create a deeper aware- 
ness of the role of the Christian on campus and in the com- 
munity, to strengthen its participants in the Christian faith and 
to provide an outlet for spiritual expression and growth by the 
united ministries for the Disciples of Christ, Episcopal, Luther- 
an, Presbyterian and United Methodist communities. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Chi Beta Phi — National Honorary Scientific Fraternity 

Purpose: to promote interest in science by scientific investiga- 
tion, lectures by prominent scientists, papers prepared by reg- 
ular members and genera! discussion. 

Requirement: declared major in biology, chemistry, geology, 
mathematics, physics or medical technology with a 3.5 
average in 20 semester hours of math and science; 3.0 aver- 
age in all other courses. 

Christian Fellowship — Chapter of Inter- Varsity 

Purpose: to deepen and strengthen the spiritual life of par- 
ticipants through Bible study and prayer, to witness to others 
about Jesus Christ and to help them come to know Him per- 
sonally and to promote interest in world evangelism. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Circle K 

Purpose: to help students become involved in school and com- 
munity through sharing, service and concern, and to promote 
fellowship through various social activities, (part of Kiwanis 
Club) 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Circolo Italiano 

Purpose: to promote an opportunity for students of Italian cul- 
ture to pursue their interests. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 



1 20/Clubs and Organizations 



community. 

College Republicans 

Purpose: to bring College students into the Republican Party and 
provide them the opportunity to find political expression and 
recognition; to encourage participation in the activities of the 
Republican Party and promote its ideals; to collect, discuss, 
and dissiminate information concerning political affairs; to 
coordinate activities of all Republicans on campus. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Crew Club 

Purpose: to establish a rowing team at MWC and to back the 
team and promote enthusiasm for it on the campus. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Der Deutsche Verein 

Purpose: to promote interest in the cultural aspects of Germany 

and German speaking countries. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 

community. 

Ecology Club 

Purpose: to seek information about our environment and to en- 
courage an active interest and participation in its maintenance 
and improvement, and to maintain an active relationship with 
the Fredericksburg community. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

El Club Espanol 

Purpose: to promote an interest in the Hispanic culture and lang- 
uage; provides an opportunity for students of Spanish to enjoy 
the songs, dances, foods and customs of all Spanish coun- 
tries, and raise scholarship funds for a student studying 
abroad. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Eta Sigma Phi — National Honorary Classics Fraternity 

Purpose: to promote and stimulate interest in and study of the 
language, literature, art and history of ancient Greece and 
Rome. 



Clubs and Organizations/ 1 2 1 



Requirement: a 3.0 average in 1 2 hours of Classics courses, 
with at least 9 hours in ancient Greek and/or Latin. 

Frisbee Club 

Purpose: to promote an interest in the sport of frisbee. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Gamma Theta Upsslon — International Honorary 
Geographical Society 

Purpose: to further professional interest in geography by afford- 
ing a common organization for those interested in this field. 

Requirement: a 3.2 average in 1 5 hours of geography with at 
least a 2.6 overall average. 

Hillel 

Purpose: to promote understanding of traditions and beliefs of 

Judaism. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 

community. 



History Club 

Purpose: to encourage and promote interest in history and to 
sponsor activities which provide insight into the field of his- 
tory. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Hoofprints 

Purpose: to develop interest and skill in horsemanship. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

International Relations Club 

Purpose: to further an interest in and a knowledge of past and 

present international affairs. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 

community. 

Kappa Delta Pi — Nu Xi Chapter 

Purpose: to uphold the ideals of knowledge-duty-power, to pro- 
mote a closer bond among students of education and to enter 
into a more intimate fellowship with those dedicated to the 



1 22/Clubs and Organizations 



cause of teaching as a profession, to promote high standards 
of preparation for teaching and to invite into bonds of fellow- 
ship those who have attained excellence of scholarship and 
distinction of achievement as students and servants of edu- 
cation. 
Requirement: junior standing with a 3.0 average, seeking Col- 
legiate Professional certification. 

Karate Club 

Purpose: to promote an interest in the martial arts. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Lambda lota Tau — National Honorary Fraternity 

Purpose: to promote interest in literary achievement. 
Requirement: junior or senior English major, 1 2 hours of upper- 
level English courses, and 2.8 overall. 

Le Cercle Francais 

Purpose: to encourage an interest in the French language and 
culture through various club-sponsored activities. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Medical Technology Club 

Purpose: to promote interest among students and to guide them 

toward their future in medical technology. 
Requirement: open to all interested memers of the College 

community. 

Mortar Board — Senior Honor Society (Cap and Gown Chapter) 

Purpose: to provide equal opportunity to all peoples, to empha- 
size the advancement of the status of women, to support the 
ideals of the status of women, to support the ideals of the Col- 
lege, to advance a spirit of scholarship, to recognize and en- 
courage leadership, and to provide service. 

Requirement: senior, 3.0 over-all average; election. 

Mu Phi Epsilon — National Honorary Music Fraternity 

Purpose: to advance music in America and throughout the 
world, the promotion of musicianship and scholarship, loyalty 
to the Alma Mater. 

Requirement: a 3.0 average or better in music, 2.0 overall aver- 
age, and election. 



Clubs and Organizations/1 23 



Music Educator's National Conference 

Purpose: to provide opportunities for development of profes- 
sional attitudes and techniques in music education. 

Requirement: interest in the teaching of music; authorization by 
chapter adviser; not being employed full-time in music educa- 
tion. 

Newman Movement 

Purpose: to foster the spiritual, intellectual and social lives of the 

Roman Catholic students. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 

community. 

NORML 

Purpose: NORML is a political lobby that has as its goal the im- 
mediate end to the criminal prohibition of private marijuana 
use; the right of possession to include other acts incidental to 
such possession including cultivation and transportation for 
personal use and the casual, non-profit transfers of small 
amounts of marijuana. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Outing Club 

Purpose: to encourage interest and fellowship in the out-of- 
doors and to teach skills of outdoor living and recreational acti- 
vities such as camping, square-dancing, skiing, canoeing, 
climbing, hiking, etc. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Phi Alpha Theta — National History Honorary Society 

Purpose: to promote the study of history and to recognize those 

students who have exhibited excellence in that field. 
Requirement: overall 3.0 average; 3.2 average in history. 

Phi Sigma lota — National Honorary Romance Language 
Fraternity 

Purpose: to prepare students for graduate school and other posi- 
tions requiring a knowledge of the Romance languages. 

Requirement: juniors with a 3.5 in Romance languages and a 3.0 
overall average. A student must be planning to continue with a 
conversational or literature course in one or more of the 
Romance languages. 



1 24/Clubs and Organizations 



Physical Therapy Club 

Purpose: to promote an intelligent interest and to provide orien- 
tation in the field of physical therapy through the promotion of 
interaction between club members and physical therapy de- 
partments in hospitals, professional schools and rehabilita- 
tion centers; and to make available work experiences in the 
field of physical therapy. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Pi Gamma Mu-IMational Social Science Honorary Society 

Purpose: to improve scholarship in the social studies; to inspire 
social service to humanity and to promote mutual understand- 
ing among all peoples. 

Requirement: 20 semester hours in social studies and a B aver- 
age with no failures in any subject. 

Pi IMu Chi 

Purpose: to provide nursing students with information about 
transfer programs to nursing schools and give them an oppor- 
tunity to participate in various social and service activities 
throughout the year. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Pre-Law Society 

Purpose: to nurture an interest in the legal field. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Pre-Med Association 

Purpose: to further interest in and knowledge of medicine as a 

career. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 

community. 

Psi Chi — National Society in Psychology 

Purpose: to advance the science of psychology; to encourage, 
stimulate and maintain the scholarship of the individual mem- 
bers in all fields, especially in psychology. 

Requirement: psychology majors with an overall GPA of at least 
3.0 and an average of 3.25 or better in psychology. At least 
1 2 credit hours of psychology must be counted. 



Clubs and Organizations/1 25 



Psychology Club 

Purpose: to promote and stimulate an interest in the field of psy- 
chology. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Rugby Football Club 

Purpose: to incorporate the game of rugby into the recreational 
activities of the students and to promote the comraderie 
which is duly associated with the sport. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Russian Club 

Purpose: to promote a greater interest in and understanding of 
the language and culture of the Soviet Union. 

Requirement: all college students interested in the Russian way 
of life, language and culture may become members. 

Softball Club 

Purpose: to promote interest in the sport of softball. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Speech Pathology Club 

Purpose: to promote interest in speech pathology on campus, to 
promote activities which provide an insight into the profes- 
sional aspects of the major and to promote cohesiveness 
among students in the Speech Pathology Program. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 

Terrapin Club 

Purpose: to promote interest and develop skill in synchronized 

swimming. 
Requirement: try-outs for swimming strokes and stunts; a good 

scholastic average. 

Tri-Muse Society 

Purpose: to take an active interest in the performing arts and to 
serve as a positive force in the support of the Department of 
Dramatic Arts and Dance. 

Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 
community. 



1 26/Clubs and Organizations 



Varsity Club 

Purpose: to promote spirit in the College community. 
Requirement: completion of one season as a member or mana- 
ger of a varsity team, and recognition by coach. 

Young Democrats 

Purpose: to stimulate an interst in local and nationwide political 

activity. 
Requirement: open to all interested members of the College 

community. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

Phi Beta Kappa is a national society, now two hundred years 
old, which recognizes the achievement of humane learning by 
students at the college. Its Greek motto translated signifies, 
"Love of wisdom the guide of life." The objectives of this inter- 
nationally recognized honor society are intellectual honesty and 
tolerance, range of intellectual interests, and encouragement of 
understanding — not merely knowledge. The local chapter, Kap- 
pa of Virginia, was installed in 1971 and each year it initiates a 
select group of junior and senior students. 

PERFORMING GROUPS 

College Community Symphony Orchestra is an instrumental 
musical organization composed of faculty, students and com- 
munity participants. It presents four concerts each year. 

MWC Chorus is a chorus of treble singers comprised totally of 
college students. It presents two concerts each year and makes 
an annual tour. 

Fredericksburg Chamber Ensemble is a chamber group of 
faculty, students and community participants. It presents two 
concerts each year. 

The Department of Dramatic Arts and Dance also presents 
theatrical productions and dance concerts on a regular basis 
throughout the school year. 

RECREATION ASSOCIATION 

Every student enrolled in Mary Washington is a member of the 
Recreation Association, and there is no fee for membership. The 
purpose of the Recreation Association is to provide an oppor- 
tunity for students to participate in a variety of activities, to 
stimulate an interest in many forms of recreation, to create a 
spirit of good sportsmanship and to cooperate with other cam- 
pus organizations in promoting and maintaining the highest 



Clubs and Organizations/1 27 



standards of College life. 

The R. A. Council is composed of two representatives from 
each residence hall, one representative from each small house, 
and four representatives from the day student body. These 
representatives are elected by their respective constituents in 
the fall of each academic year and are responsible for keeping 
their constituents informed of all R. A. activities. The R. A. 
representatives are also responsible for helping organize cam- 
pus intramurals, Devil-Goat Day and various other R. A. spon- 
sored functions. 

Activities of the Association 

The officers and the council members of the Recreation 
Association provide intramurals in volleyball, racquetball, flag 
football, basketball, soccer, tennis, Softball and ping pong — all 
for the enjoyment of the student body. Additional activities are 
included in the program as student interest warrants. The 
association also sponsors ski trips and CPR clinics. 

The students who participate in the intramural program repre- 
sent their residence hall or day student organization. The team 
with the highest percentage of participation at the year's end 
gains possession of the Recreation Association Silver Bowl for 
the next college session. 

In the spring, the R. A. organizes a day unique to Mary 
Washington — Devil-Goat Day. Students who come to Mary 
Washington College in an odd year are Devils; the even year en- 
trants are Goats. Devil-Goat Day is a field day of campus-wide 
fun and competition, with refreshments, wild relay races, a 
faculty/student Softball game, a marathon run around campus, a 
scavenger hunt and much more. Following the events of the 
day, all participants enjoy a picnic dinner on the lawn. 

Each year, a plaque is awarded to the winner of Devil-Goat 
Day. There is also the R. A. Annual Sports Awards Banquet 
which honors all participants in intramural sports during the 
academic year. This is held at the end of the academic year. 



12 8/ Clubs and Organizations 



DIRECTORY OF STUDENT LEADERSHIP 

HONOR COUNCIL 

President Lisa Nichols 

Senior Representatives Dawn Forbes 

. . . Debbie McGehee 

Junior Representatives to be elected 

. . . Jenny Sharp 

Sophomore Representatives Linda Lee 

. . . Rosann Sedlacko 

Freshman Representatives to be elected 

. . . to be elected 



HONOR COUNSELORS 

Anderson, Susan 
Baugh, Teresa 
Caton, Debi 
Bowden, Ann 
Birchett, Rosemary 
Chichester, Elizabeth 
Chidester, Mary 
Crofford, Kris 
Davis, Summer 
Deane, Ginger 
Devine, Erin 
Devorshak, Elisa 
Donnelly, Patricia 
Evans, Louise 
Foster, Lori 
Elmore, Teresa 
Epson, Kathleen 
Goliash, Patricia 
Goodwin, Jennifer 
Gordon, Melanie 
Graziose, Lisa 
Hamlett, Stephanie 
Hawke, Paul 
Haynes, Patricia 
Hayward, Nancy 
Howell, Linda 
Hudacheck, Mary 
Ingrao, Mark 
Jansen, Andrea 



Jones, Linda 
Kellogg, Katy 
Kenney, Kathleen 
Kersenbrock, Kristin 
Komito, Audrey 
Koteles, Karen Ann 
Long, Cindy 
Lovingood, Elizabeth 
McKay, Cheryl 
Mattingly, Cyndi 
Mazur, Felicia 
Meaney, Bridget 
Moll, Elleanore 
Mooney, Robert 
Moynihan, Terri 
Parks, Val 
Perdue, Amy 
Retan, Nanci 
Saracco, Julie 
Schoeb, Barbara 
Schultze, Diana 
Shadrick, Rachel 
Shields, Frank 
Smith, Donna 
Stull, Martin 
Tent, Suzanne 
Traweek, Dottie 
Walbroehl, Yvonne 
Wolotkiewicz, Diana 



Clubs and Organizations/ 1 29 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

President Steve Schlimgen 

Vice President Victor Yastrop 

Academic Affairs Chairman Mary Pat Gallagher 

Judicial Chairman Diane Lewis 

Student Association Whip BobMooney 

Secretary-Treasurer Patty Reilly 

Advisers 

Residential Council President Paul Hawke 

Day Student President Sue Whitman 

SENATE COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Secretary-Treasurer BobbiSabanosh 

Publicity Donna Smith 

Rules and Procedures JimHely 

Special Projects Rachel Shadrick 

Student Organization and Procedures Martha Williams 

Welfare Ann Campbell 

Coordinating Alissa North 

DAY STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

President Sue Whitman 

Vice President Debbie Pfeiffer 

FIRE AND SAFETY MARSHALL 

Chief Fire Marshall Jim Martin 

JUDICIAL COURT MEMBERS 

Seniors Linda Howell 

. . . Cindi Long 

Juniors Leslie Vernon 

. . . Susan Dill 

Sophomores Mike Bennett 

. . . Andy Jensen 

Freshmen to be elected 

. . . to be elected 

HALL JUDICIAL CHAIRMEN 

Ball Karen Harman 

Brent to be appointed 

Bushnell to be appointed 

Custis David A. Hawkens 

Framar Vicky Nichols 



1 30/Clubs and Organizations 



Hamlet Mike Kelly 

Jefferson Tambrey Matthews 

Madison CedricRucker 

Marshall Karen Koteles 

Marye to be appointed 

Mason Polly Batchelder 

Randolph Mary Pat Gallagher 

Russell PatThomasson 

Trench Hill to be appointed 

Virginia to be appointed 

Westmoreland MarciaGrozen 

CLASS COUNCIL 

President Amy Hauck 

Secretary and Treasurer LeanneHaskins 

Publicity Chairman Vicki Reynard 

Senior Class 

President Amy Hauck 

Vice President Sameena Ahmed 

Secretary and Treasurer LeanneHaskins 

Publicity Chairman Toni Luscavage 

Junior Class 

President MaryChidester 

Vice President Audrey Komito 

Secretary and Treasurer Lori Rosche 

Publicity Chairman Vicki Reynard 

Sophomore Class 

President Trenda Powell 

Vice President M. C. Morris 

Secretary and Treasurer Nancy Brannegan 

Publicity Chairman AnnSketchley 

Freshman Class 

President to be elected 

Vice President , .to be elected 

Secretary and Treasurer to be elected 

Publicity Chairman to be elected 



RECREATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

President Susan Dishman 



Clubs and Organizations/1 31 



FRESHMAN COUNSELORS FOR 1979-80 

Head Freshman Counselor LisaBrehm 

Madison Custis 

Paul S. Tracy George Semples 

Mason 
Martha L. Cline Mary E. O'Connell 

Darla J, Fjeld Kathryn G. Otto 

Bridget A. Meaney Sharon R. Sachs 

Randolph 
Tamara J. Clark Cynthia R. Parrish 

Mary K. Lohr Mary K. Taylor 

Derry A. Velardi 

RESIDENTIAL COUNCIL 

President Paul Hawke 

Secretary-Treasurer to be elected 

Residential Hall Presidents 

Ball Nancy Hayward 

Brent Lisa Meisterich 

Bushnell Chandler Howell 

Custis Frank Shields 

Framar To be elected 

Hamlet Mike Kelly 

Jefferson LynnHoneycutt 

Madison Martin Stull 

Marshall Paul Hawke 

Marye To be elected 

Mason Debbie Powers 

Randolph Kathy Epson 

Russell .Cathy Ramsey 

Trench Hill Cindi Hammond 

Virginia Suzanne Tent 

Westmoreland Ann Smiley 

BOARD OF PUBLICATIONS AND BROADCASTING 

THE BULLET 

Editor Gary Webb 

THE BA TTLEFIELD 

Editor Carol Miller 

AUBADE 

Editor PamTroutman 

WMWC 

Station Manager Moira McKeough 



1 32/Clubs and Organizations 



INTER-CLUB ASSOCIATION 

President 



Cedric Rucker 



PRESIDENTS AND ADVISERS OF ICA ORGANIZA TIONS 



Afro-American Association 
Cedric Rucker, president 
Dale Brown and Sally 
Washington, advisers 

Alpha Psi Omega 

Elizabeth P. Palmer, president 
Neil Howard, adviser 

American Chemical Society 
Joanne Whelan, president 
Roy Gratz, adviser 

Art Therapy Club 
President, to be elected 
Paul Muick, adviser 

Baptist Student Union 
Martha Ann White, president 
Anna Mae Harris, adviser 

Campus Christian Community 
Darla Fjeld, president 
Loreda Jones, adviser 

Chi Beta Phi 

Patty Goliash, president 
Al Lindsey, Mary and Bill 
Pinschmidt, Bulent Atalay, 
advisers 

Christian Fellowship 
Sue Massey, president 
Joseph DiBella, adviser 

Circle K 

Mary Brown, president 
Joe Conroy, adviser 



Circolo Italiano 
Pam Talbot, president 
Clavio Ascari, adviser 

College Republicans 
Susan Robertson, president 
Sam Emory, adviser 

Crew Club 
Dee Velardi, president 
Steve Jones, adviser 

Der Deutsche Verein 
Lisa Lewis, president 
Sammy Merrill, Vera Niebuhr, 
advisers 

Ecology Club 
Jeff Bower, president 
Bill Pinschmidt, adviser 

El Club Espanol 
Ana Catoni, president 
Aniano Pena, adviser 

Eta Sigma Phi 
Susan Anderson, president 
Adviser, to be elected 

Frisbee Club 
Eric Wootten, president 
Steve Jones, adviser 

Gamma Theta Upsilon 
President, to be elected 
James Gouger, adviser 



Clubs and Organizations/ 1 33 



Hillel 
Irene Suhler, president 
Roy Weinstock, adviser 

History 
President, to be elected 
Richard Warner, adviser 

Hoofprints 
President, to be elected 
Anita Reidl, adviser 

International Relations Club 
Ford Hart, president 
John Kramer, adviser 

Kappa Delta Pi 
Gail Melanson, president 
Joe Holmes, adviser 

Karate Club 
Sky Switzer, president 
Ed Hegmann, adviser 

Lambda lota Tau 
President, to be elected 
Sidney Mitchell, adviser 

Le Cercle Francais 
Kathleen Jones, president 
John Manolis, adviser 

Medical Technology 
Mary Kay Lohr, president 
Mike Bass, adviser 

Mortar Board 
Mary Perkins, president 
Mildred Droste, Sue Hanna, 
Janet Zeleznock, Herbert 
Cover, advisers 

Mu Phi Epsilon 
Martha Cline, president 
Anne Hamer, adviser 



Music Educators National 
Conference 

Sue Tillery, president 

Jim Baker, adviser 

Newman Movement 
Gail Melanson, president 
Adviser, to be elected 

NORML 
Tutt Stapp, president 
Sue Hanna, adviser 

Outing Club 
President, to be elected 
Miriam Greenberg, adviser 

Phi Alpha Theta 
Gayle Pope, president 
Ben Zimdars, adviser 

Phi Sigma lota 
Vicky Harris, president 
Mary E. Stephenson, adviser 

Physical Therapy 
Theresa Goodwyn, president 
Ruth Freidman, adviser 

Pi Gamma Mu 
President, to be elected 
Robert Rycroft, adviser 

Pi Nu Chi 
Mary Pat Fisk, president 
Judith Crissman, adviser 

Pre-Law 
Tom Talisman, president 
Steven Czarsty, adviser 

Pre-Med 
President, to be elected 
Bernard Mahoney, adviser 



1 34/Clubs and Organizations 



Psi Chi 
Barbara Pittman, president 
Kaisa Puhakka, adviser 

Psychology Club 
Mary Heinike, president 
Adviser, to be elected 

Rugby Club 
President, to be elected 
Richard Warner, adviser 



Speech Pathology 
Laura Proto, president 
Albert Duke, adviser 

Terrapin Club 

Lori Foster, president 
Mildred Droste, adviser 

Tri-Muse Society 

Mary E. Sheridan, president 
Steve Larson, adviser 



Russian Club 
Barbara Hammer, president 
Joseph Bozicevic, adviser 

Softball Club 
Patty Loving, president 
Ed Hegmann, adviser 



Varsity Club 

Eva Burns, president 
Ed Hegmann, adviser 

Young Democrats 

Lisa Harrington, president 
George Van Sant, adviser 



INDEX 



Absences From Class 27 

Academic Advising 17 

Academic Buildings 18 

Academic Counseling and Guidance Committee 101 

Academic Public Occasions Committee 101 

Accident Reports 27 

Administrative Hearing 27-30 

Administrative Regulations 27 

Admissions Policy Committee 101-102 

Afro-American Club 118,132 

Alcoholic Beverages 30 

Alpha Psi Omega 118,132 

American Chemical Society 118,132 

Ann Carter Lee Hall 1 8, 61 

Art Therapy Club 118,132 

Assistant Dean for Career Services 13 

Automobile Registration and Parking Regulations 30-32 

Babysitting 32 

Bad Check Charge 32 

Bank 18 

Banking 17 

Baptist Student Union 1 1 8-1 1 9, 1 32 

Bicycles 17,32 

Board of Publications 131 

Bookstore 17,18 

Building Hours 18 

By-Laws, Class Council 99-100 

"C'Shop 18,22 

Campus Christian Community 119,132 

Campus Judicial Court 75-77 

Career Placement Services 18,19 

Change of Address 32 

Change in Residence 33 

Chi Beta Phi 119,132 

Christian Fellowship 119,132 

Cir de K 119, 132 

Circolo Italiano 119,132 

Class Council 95 

Class Council Constitution 95-100 

Class Officers . 1 30 

Clearance for On-Campus Representatives 33 

Closing Hours of Residence Halls 33, 57 

Clubs and Organizations 116-127 




136/lndex 



Clubs, Presidents of 1 32-1 33 

College Bulletin 20 

College Organization 11-16 

College Physician 16 

College Police 20 

College Regulations 26-56 

College Republicans 1 20, 1 32 

College Services 1 7-25 

College Shop 18 

Committee on College Affairs 102 

Committee on Special Degree Programs 102 

Comptroller 13 

Constitution, Student Association 81-94 

Cooking and Ironing 33 

Counseling and Guidance — Counseling Center 20-21 

Crew Club 1 20, 1 32 

Curriculum Committee 1 02 

Day Students Association 129 

Day Students Lounge 18, 57-58 

Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid 13 

Dean of the College 12 

Dean of Students 14 

Der Deutsche Verein 120,132 

Desk Duty 58 

Director of Counseling Center 15 

Director of Development 15 

Director of Information Services 16 

Director of Institutional Research 12 

Director of Internship Programs 13 

Drinking of Alcohol 58-59 

Drugs 33-34 

Educational Records 34-40 

Election Guideline, Role, and Responsibilities of Departmental 

Representatives 1 02, 1 03 

Ecology Club 1 20, 1 32 

El Club Espanol 1 20, 1 32 

E. Lee trinkle Library 19,23 

Employment and Financial Assistance 21 

Eta Sigma Phi . . 1 20-1 21 , 1 32 

Executive Cabinet of the Student Association 72 

Field Trips 21 

Firearms 40 

Fire Drills and Safety 40, 1 29 

Food Services 21-22 

Frisbee Club 1 21 , 1 32 

Freshman Class Officers 130 



Index/ 137 



Freshman Counselors, 1 979-80 131 

Furnishing for Residence Hall Rooms 40 

Gamma Theta Upsilon 1 21 , 1 32 

George Washington Hall 19 

Goolrick Hall 19 

Grievance Procedure 41 -44 

Group Parties 44, 59-61 

Guests 44-45, 61-63 

Guests, meals 22 

Hail Judicial Chairman 129-130 

Hearing, Joint Council 78-80 

Hillel 121, 133 

History Club 1 21 , 1 33 

Honor Code 1 04 

Honor Constitution 104-1 1 5 

Honor Council Officers 128 

Honor Counselors 128 

Honor Pledge 1 04 

Hoofprints Club 121,133 

Hours, Building . 18 

Identification Cards 22 

Infirmary 23 

Instruction and Academic Affairs Committee 102 

Inter-Club Association 11 7-1 1 8 

Inter-Club Association President 132 

Intercollegiate Teams 117 

International Relations Club 121,133 

Internship Committee 102 

Joint Council 77-78 

Judicial Branch of the Student Association 73-74 

Judicial Court Members 129 

Junior Class Officers 1 30 

Kappa Delta Pi 121-122,133 

Keys 45 

Lambda lota Tau 1 22, 1 33 

Laundry 23 

Leave of Absence 45 

Le Cercle Francais 1 22, 1 33 

Legislative Procedures of the Senate 72-73 

Librarian 15 

Library 23-24, 45-47 

Library Committee 102 

Lost and Found 24 



/ 38/lndex 



Lounge A 19 

Lounge B 19 

Mail 47 

Male Housing 24, 48 

Meal Prices for Guests 22 

Medical Technology Club 1 22, 1 33 

Mortar Board 1 22, 1 33 

Mu Phi Epsilpn 1 22, 1 33 

Music Educator's National Conference 1 23, 1 33 



Newman Movement 1 23, 1 33 

NORML , 1 23, 1 33 

Notice to Leave Premises 48-49 



Office of Student Activities 19 

Outing Club 1 23, 1 33 

Payment of Accounts 49 

Performing Groups 126 

Penalties for Violations 63-65 

Permissions 49-50 

Phi Alpha Theta 123,133 

Phi Beta Kappa 126 

Phi Sigma lota 1 23, 1 33 

Physical Therapy Club 1 24, 1 33 

Pi Gamma Mu 1 24, 1 33 

Pi Nu Chi 1 24, 1 33 

Pre-Law Society 1 24, 1 33 

Pre-Med Society 1 24, 1 33 

President of the College 12 

President of Inter-Club Association 132 

Presidents of the Clubs 1 32-1 33 

Procedure for Appeal to Judicial Appeallate Board 76-77 

Procedure for Appellate Hearing 77 

Procedure for Appeal of Joint Council Decisions 80-81 

Procedure for Campus Judicial Court Hearings 75-76 

Procedure for Investigation of Social Infractions 74-75 

Procedure for Open Hearings .81 

Psi Chi 1 24, 1 34 

Psychology Club 1 25, 1 34 

Publications 116-117 

Publications, Board of 1 1 6, 1 31 

Publicity Committee, Senate 73 

Recreation Association 1 26-1 27, 1 30 

Recreation Association, Activities of 127 



Index/ 139 



Recreation Use of Goolrick Hall 24-25, 50 

Reserve Parlor 19 

Residence Hall Directors 16 

Residence Hall Judicial Chairman 74 

Residence Hall Keys 65-66 

Residence Halls 65 

Residential Assistants 131 

Residential Council President 131 

Rugby Football Club 1 25, 1 34 

Rules and Procedures Committee, Senate 73 

Russian Club 1 25, 1 34 

Sales 50, 61 

Seacobeck Hall 21-22 

Searches and Seizures 67-68 

Secretary-Treasurer, Senate 72-73 

Senate Committee Chairmen 129 

Senior Class Officers 130 

Smoking of Tobacco 53, 68 

Softball Club 125, 134 

Sophomore Class Officers 1 30 

Special Projects Committee, Senate 73 

Speech Pathology Club 125, 134 

Standing Committees of the Senate 72-73 

Student Affairs 71-115 

Student Association 71 , 1 29 

Student Association Advisers 129 

Student Association Constitution 81-89 

Student Association Executive Branch 71-72 

Student Association Faculty Dining Plan 68 

Student Association Organization 71-81 

Student Association Purpose 71 

Student-Faculty Disputes . 68 

Student Housing Contract 51-53 

Student Membership on Faculty Committees 

and Departmental Representatives 101-115 

Student Organization and Procedures Committee, Senate 73 

Student Rules 56-70 

Student Welfare Committee, Senate 73 

Telephone Service 25 

Terrapin Club 1 25, 1 34 

Trash Disposal 53 

Tri-Muse Society 1 25, 1 34 

Trunks 53 

Use and Scheduling of College Facilities 53-55 

Use of Mary Washington College Name 55 



140/ Index 



Varsity Club 1 26, 1 34 

Vice President and Director of Summer and Continuing 

Educational Programs 12 

Vice President for Administration and Planning 12 

Visitation 55, 69-70 

Visitation Regulations 70 

Withdrawals 55-56 

Young Democrats 1 26, 1 34 






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MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 

DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS - 1979-80 



Department of Anthropology, Geography 
and Sociology L. Clyde Carter, Jr. 

Department of Art Barbaras. Meyer 

Department of Biology Stephen W. Fuller 

Department of Chemistry 
and Geology Bernard L. Mahoney, Jr. 

Department of Classics, Philosophy and 
Religion Elizabeth A. Clark 

Department of Dramatic Arts and Dance Roger L. Kenvin 

Department of Economics, Business and 
Public Affairs Steven L. Czarsty 

Department of Education PaulC. Slayton, Jr. 

Department of English, Linguistics 
and Speech J. William Kemp, Jr. 

Department of Health 
and Physical Education Edward H. Hegmann, II 

Department of History 
and American Studies William B. Crawley, Jr. 

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
and Physics Alexander J. Lindsey 

Department of Modern Foreign 
Languages Mary Ellen Stephenson 

Department of Music James E.Baker 

Department of Psychology Bruce David MacEwen 

Teacher Certification Advising PaulC. Slayton, Jr. 



Mary 


Fredericksburg, 


Washington 


Virginia 


College 


22401